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SciArt-L Discussion List-for Natural Science Illustration- <[log in to unmask]>
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Rosemary Volpe <[log in to unmask]>
Date:
Mon, 17 Nov 1997 15:38:25 -0500
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> All computer work is
>>addictive, like TV.
>>
>ya, this is true, but why???
>
>I think it's because a piece of your brain becomes engaged in trying to
>think like the machine, because the machine is not that transparent.  Weird
>how addictive it is though.
>
>-Clara

One of my pet theories on this is that both TV & computers directly engage
the mind on some unconscious level; that's where we're most comfortable
with visual images (e.g., dreams also use imagery as their primary
language). In some ways it may be similar to the creative process used in
drawing, you know, the right brain thing. However, it's scarier with TV,
especially for children, because the images are absorbed so readily and
easily, it really does by-pass any thinking process. That's why commercials
work so well too. And it can be very powerful. I feel it's really important
for parents to watch TV with kids and talk about what they're seeing (I can
hardly stand some of the stuff myself--just goes to show that just because
you can morph stuff on the computer doesn't mean you really should).

Well, that's my lecture for today. I've always found this interesting.

Rosemary

Rosemary Volpe                          [log in to unmask]
Publications Editor                     Phone: 203/432-3786
Peabody Museum of Natural History       Fax: 203/432-9816
Yale University
170 Whitney Avenue, P.O. Box 208118
New Haven, CT  06520-8118 USA

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