LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 16.5

Help for SCIART-L Archives


SCIART-L Archives

SCIART-L Archives


SCIART-L@LISTSERV.UNL.EDU


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

SCIART-L Home

SCIART-L Home

SCIART-L  August 2008

SCIART-L August 2008

Subject:

Re: conference publicity

From:

Joan Lee <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

SciArt-L Discussion List-for Natural Science Illustration- <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Mon, 11 Aug 2008 14:56:55 -0400

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (229 lines)

My comments went poof?! Oh boy.

Frank, I understand clearly what you are writing, and I agree with you. 
It is very important to distinguish between science illustration and 
other types, methods, conventions of visual communication. This is why 
I do not like the idea of "art of science illustration." It muddies the 
waters.

Just recently I talked with a person at UMFK who wrote, in essence, 
that a bunch of artists are coming to Fort Kent next year. I 
immediately corrected him and he published the correction. Then we got 
into a discussion about differences, scopes, etc. While searching for a 
good keynote speaker I had to keep emphasizing  THINK SCIENCE not 
minimalism or realism or "nature art" . . . Joan

On Aug 11, 2008, at 1:10 PM, Frank Ippolito wrote:

>  Janet,
>
>  yes your reply got eaten by the cyber beast, as did part of Joan's 
> earlier reply. I hate when all our work just goes poof.
>
>  I do know that '03 article - in fact I replied to it and my response 
> was published in Nature a couple months later in March '03. The 
> editors did in fact water my reply down to the point that it barely 
> sharpened. but the point was made. the letter is linked here...
>
> http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v422/n6927/full/422015a.html
>
>  for those who cannot read the archives w/o paying, the body of my 
> letter is pasted below- though it may not make much sense without 
> reading the article I was reacting to...
>
> The subtle beauty of art in the service of science
>
> Frank Ippolito1
> 	1 	Division of Vertebrate Paleontology, American Museum of Natural 
> History, 79th Street & Central Park West, New York, New York 10024, 
> USA
>
>
> Abstract
>
> An illustration may be intended to emphasize details, convey an idea 
> or raise questions.
>  Sir,
>
> As a professional scientific illustrator I feel compelled to respond 
> to Julio Ottino's Commentary "Is a picture worth 1,000 words?" 
> (Nature 421, 474–476; 2003). I believe that Ottino's criticisms of 
> scientific illustration are founded on an incorrect understanding of 
> the field.
>
> Galileo's drawings can't be compared with magazine covers: they are 
> two unrelated types of illustration. It is incorrect to conclude from 
> such a comparison that scientific disparity exists between them 
> because the magazine covers "are left in the hands of artists and 
> illustrators" — this artwork was intended to enhance editorial 
> material rather than to illustrate research.
>
> Such conceptual illustrations are designed to pose questions. Their 
> use on the cover of a science magazine offers the promise of articles 
> that inform these questions. The cover art of the 30 January 2003 
> issue of Nature (see figure) and the related News and Views and Letter 
> (Nature 421, 489–490; 2003 & Nature 421, 530–533; 2003) follow this 
> convention. The image does not illustrate the research itself; that is 
> not its intended application. Furthermore, the choice of digital 
> medium, whether used by the hand of a scientist or the hand of an 
> artist, has no bearing on this question.
>
> Scientific illustration follows a different mandate, and it can often 
> be found within the pages of the very magazines under discussion. 
> These drawings outline structure and clarify detail, as required by 
> the subject and requested by the researcher. Because they communicate 
> subtleties and eliminate the ambiguities of language, scientific 
> illustrations are an important, often necessary, element in precise 
> communication (see The Guild Handbook of Scientific Illustration, 
> edited by E. R. S. Hodges; Van Nostrand Reinhold, 1989).
>
> Scientific illustration is a clearly defined field that benefits from 
> active collaboration between scientist and illustrator. Using their 
> professional observational skills, scientific illustrators strive to 
> render the most accurate representation of their subject. It is, by 
> definition, art in the service of science. The act of drawing is, in 
> essence, the act of editing. Complaints about omitted details miss 
> this important point. Scientific illustrators are trained to eliminate 
> non-essential information. The twisted stem of a dried plant is 
> smoothed out. The broken edge of a fossil bone is repaired. Cracks and 
> discoloration may be removed. These subjects are thus rendered in a 
> way chosen to amplify those details that require emphasis.
>
> Scientific illustrations, even conceptual cover art, should be as 
> accurate as possible. However, Ottino's proposal to establish rules 
> governing the use of realistic rendering techniques is superfluous. 
> Professional standards are already in place for scientific 
> illustration. Magazine editors recognize that their educated 
> readership can distinguish between a beautifully rendered concept and 
> the current state of scientific research. Scientific illustrations 
> exist within this context. They communicate with and within 
> conventions that reach back in time from this issue of Nature to the 
> pages of Galileo's notebooks.
>
> -frank
>
>> Okay, I just emailed an incredibly long rant about science 
>> illustration and Nature Journal that I think got lost in cyberspace!
>>
>> Rather than repeat the WHOLE THING, I will just mention an article in 
>> Nature Journal, 30 January 2003 issue that wasn't so flattering. The 
>> cover title says "Scientific illustration Can you believe your eyes?" 
>> and inside, the title is "Is a picture worth 1,000 words?" It's by 
>> Julio M. Ottino, R.R. McCormick School of Engineering and Applied 
>> Science, Northwestern University.
>>
>> It's a critique that much of the science art that is published today 
>> is "divorced from science and science plausibility."
>>
>> Janet Wilkins
>>
>>
>>> From: Joan Lee <[log in to unmask]>
>>> Date: 2008/08/11 Mon AM 10:42:58 CDT
>>> To: [log in to unmask]
>>> Subject: Re: [SCIART] conference publicity
>>>
>>
>>> On Aug 11, 2008, at 11:28 AM, Frank Ippolito wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>>  it is a nice prop in an important publication. though the basic
>>>> sentiment is about how integral illustration is within the 
>>>> sciences, 
>>>> I do wish that the author hadn't repeated returned focus on the
>>>> aspects seen at the meeting that had so little to do with actual
>>>> science illustration. Terryl Whitlatch's "fantasy creatures...
>>>> inspired by the anatomy of real animals" is a nice sidebar to our
>>>> profession. on its own it would have served as such. but the author
>>>> then quotes Warren Allmon description of "... inspired guesses, and
>>>> artistic creativity to form a picture of what animals may have once
>>>> looked like." all the part's of Warren's talk where he mentions 
>>>> actual
>>>> paleontological illustration (and not popularized animal 
>>>> restorations)
>>>> is left out. he then mentions Jame's Gurney's Dinotopia talk. this
>>>> keynote was interesting and entertaining but not about real science
>>>> illustration. all this in a one page article leaves little room to
>>>> mention what science illustration really is and what GNSI typically
>>>> focuses on during a conference. in Omni magazine this would have 
>>>> been
>>>> expected. I guess when I see writings in journals such as Nature or
>>>> Science I am expecting an article written for scientists.
>>>>
>>>>  -frank
>>>>
>>>>> Hey, hey, hey! I got my copy of the Nature article and I didn't 
>>>>> even
>>>>> need to make the trip to Tufts (not a long drive for distance, just
>>>>> the so-called "rush hour" traffic that lasts all day).
>>>>>
>>>>> I've been looking at the link for a time and found that you didn't
>>>>> need to subscribe, however, the article still costs $32.00 and it 
>>>>> was
>>>>> just one page! (Gulp!) So, I FINALLY decided to just write to the
>>>>> library at Tufts yesterday and received a PDF copy this morning.
>>>>>
>>>>> It was well worth the wait folks!
>>>>>
>>>>> Janet P. Wilkins
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>> From: gretchen halpert <[log in to unmask]>
>>>>>> Date: 2008/07/29 Tue PM 06:51:33 CDT
>>>>>> To: [log in to unmask]
>>>>>> Subject: [SCIART] conference publicity
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Hi all,Here are two links of interest:
>>>>>> The first is from Jim Gurney's blog, with a very nice report of 
>>>>>> the
>>>>>> conference under July
>>>>>> 24th: http://gurneyjourney.blogspot.com/2008/07/guild-of-natural-
>>>>>> science-illustrators.html
>>>>>>
>>>>>> The second is an article that was in the Journal Nature. Your best
>>>>>> bet for reading it is from a university library unless you have a
>>>>>> subscription. The article came out the week before the conference
>>>>>> and was posted on the bulletin board at the
>>>>>> registration.http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v454/n7202/full/
>>>>>> 454278a.html
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Both good press for the GNSI.
>>>>>> The Ithaca conference committee rocks!
>>>>>> Cheers,Gretchen
>>>>>> Gretchen HalpertGNSI past-president (Gail, I owe you the
>>>>>> tiara.)Elmira, [log in to unmask]
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>> -- 
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>  Frank Ippolito
>>>>  Principal Scientific Assistant
>>>>  Div. Vertebrate Paleontology
>>>>  American Museum of Natural History
>>>>  Central Park West at 79th Street
>>>>  NY    NY    10024
>>>>  (212) 769-5812
>>>>  [log in to unmask]
>>>>  http://www.productionpost.com
>>>>  http://research.amnh.org/~esg/
>>>>
>>
>
>
> -- 
>
>
>  Frank Ippolito
>  Principal Scientific Assistant
>  Div. Vertebrate Paleontology
>  American Museum of Natural History
>  Central Park West at 79th Street
>  NY    NY    10024
>  (212) 769-5812
>  [log in to unmask]
>  http://www.productionpost.com
>  http://research.amnh.org/~esg/

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

Advanced Options


Options

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password


Search Archives

Search Archives


Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe


Archives

November 2022
October 2022
September 2022
August 2022
July 2022
June 2022
May 2022
April 2022
March 2022
February 2022
January 2022
December 2021
November 2021
October 2021
September 2021
August 2021
July 2021
June 2021
May 2021
April 2021
March 2021
February 2021
January 2021
December 2020
November 2020
October 2020
September 2020
August 2020
July 2020
June 2020
May 2020
April 2020
March 2020
February 2020
January 2020
December 2019
November 2019
October 2019
September 2019
August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003
December 2002
November 2002
October 2002
September 2002
August 2002
July 2002
June 2002
May 2002
April 2002
March 2002
February 2002
January 2002
December 2001
November 2001
October 2001
September 2001
August 2001
July 2001
June 2001
May 2001
April 2001
March 2001
February 2001
January 2001
December 2000
November 2000
October 2000
September 2000
August 2000
July 2000
June 2000
May 2000
April 2000
March 2000
February 2000
January 2000
December 1999
November 1999
October 1999
September 1999
August 1999
July 1999
June 1999
May 1999
April 1999
March 1999
February 1999
January 1999
December 1998
November 1998
October 1998
September 1998
August 1998
July 1998
June 1998
May 1998
April 1998
March 1998
February 1998
January 1998
December 1997
November 1997
October 1997
September 1997
August 1997
July 1997
June 1997
May 1997
April 1997
March 1997
February 1997
January 1997
December 1996
November 1996
October 1996
September 1996
August 1996
July 1996
June 1996
May 1996
April 1996
March 1996
February 1996
January 1996
December 1995
November 1995
October 1995
September 1995

ATOM RSS1 RSS2



LISTSERV.UNL.EDU

CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager