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Awesome,  I've always been able to find my wife's laptop on the network, but
I just needed to make to pc share files.  Thanks for the help.  You really
broke it down well.

Jeremy

> Networking the two platforms is pretty simple. Especially with OS X. Mac OS X
> has some software called Samba built into it which allows it to understand PC
> networking using the SMB protocol (Linux and Unix often use Samba as well for
> their networking). If you select "Connect to Server..." from the "Go" menu in
> the Finder, then you can browse your network. If you have Windows machines on
> the network that have been set to share files, then those computers should
> show up in the list.
>
> If the Windows machines don't show up, then look in your "Utilities" folder,
> inside your "Applications" folder, and open the program called "Directory
> Access".  This program allows you to configure several different directory
> services. At the bottom of the list you should see SMB. First just make sure
> that the check box next to SMB is checked, indicating that it is turned on.
> Then select SMB and click the "Configure" button. In the dialog box that pops
> up you should make sure the name of the workgroup you have selected is the
> same as the workgroup on your Windows machines. The default is usualy called
> WORKGROUP. At the Science Center we have several different workgroups, so
> using this utility I was able to select the one I wanted to join.
>
> If you are using an older version of Mac OS X that doesn't support browsing
> Windows networks (I think that's anything pre 10.2) or if you want to connect
> to a machine that for some reason isn't showing up (perhaps it's on a
> different workgroup), then you can also just type the computers address
> directly into the conect to dialog. Just enter "smb://" followed by the IP
> address of your Windows computer (for instance, smb://192.168.1.102).
>
> I usualy share files by mounting the PC on my Mac, but it is also possible to
> go the other way as well. It is off by default for security reasons, but if
> you look in the Sharing pane of your system preferences you'll see a check box
> for Windows Sharing. Just turn it on and you should be good to go.
>
> If you want to connect a Mac running OS 9 to Windows machines then it's still
> possible, but you'll need an extra application. I use a program called Dave,
> from Thursby Systems, which lets Macs and PCs see each other over the network.
> The latest version of Dave works in OS X as well, and it's supposed to have
> even better Windows file and printer sharing support than what's built into
> the operating system, but I haven't played with that myself.
>
> I hope this helps. If any of it doesn't make sense just let me know.
>
> Jeremy Stoller
> Senior Graphic Artist
> California Science Center
> (213) 744-2532
> [log in to unmask]
> www.CaliforniaScienceCenter.org
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: SciArt-L Discussion List-for Natural Science Illustration- on behalf of
> Jeremy Swan
> Sent: Sat 5/15/2004 10:17 AM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Networking  Macs and PCs
>
>> ³You could even network the two computers together without much trouble. That
>> way they could both be online at the same time, and they could each see the
>> other's hard drive to copy files back and forth. I've done this at home with
>> three computers (including a PC) and a printer, all networked together.²
>> Jeremy Stoller
>>
>> Excellent points, as echoed in my last email, but whatıs the best way to do
>> the networking and sharing files cross platform?  Is there a program to do
>> it?
>> I imagine itıs probably not an easy explanation.  I have a wireless hub with
>> a
>> mac g-4 and a G-3 ibook (both os 10.2) and a PC with windows 98 first edition
>> that Iıd like to network in (all three wireless).  The PC is my father in
>> laws, and heıs too cheap to buy a new machine.  If itıs too complicated,
>> donıt
>> sweat it, I really just want to know what works best for you.
>>
>> Thanks Jeremy,
>> Jeremy
>