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This is a previous thread about Intuos and Cintiq tablets, forwarded in its entirety at the request of more than one SCIART participant, and with a subject that can be easily found in the listserve archives.  If you followed the original, simple delete this one.

Thanks,
Bruce
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From: Will Smith <[log in to unmask]>
Date: Mon, Dec 14, 2009 at 12:11 AM
To: [log in to unmask]


I was wondering if this generous group of colleagues would give me their recommendations on what size and type of digitizing tablet and stylus to buy.  A recent bout of Repetitive Strain Injury has inspired me to switch from mouse to stylus for at least some tasks. I mostly draw freehand and scan but I do quite a lot of erasing, and some mapping etc where I intend to change to using a stylus. I know this was discussed some time ago but equipment seems to change model numbers very quickly.

Will Smith

Project Officer (Botanical Imaging)

Environmental Sciences

Department of Environment and Resource Management Toowong Brisbane Australia

Telephone (07) 38969508

 

As of 26 March 2009 the Department of Natural Resources and Water/Environmental Protection Agency integrated to form the Department of Environment and Resource Management

 

+----------------------------------------------------------------+

Think B4U Print

1 ream of paper = 6% of a tree and 5.4kg CO2 in the atmosphere

3 sheets of A4 paper = 1 litre of water

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From: Ron Ruff <[log in to unmask]>
Date: Mon, Dec 14, 2009 at 12:29 AM
To: [log in to unmask]


I use a Wacom Intuos 3. Mine is medium sized with a live area of 6 1/2 by 11.
It has a wider aspect than some, which works well for the 16x9 monitors, or people with 2 monitors.
 
Warning- if you go too big, you will have shoulder and elbow problems to go along with your wrist problems. If you go too small, you will wish you had more room for longer brush strokes, and better details.
 
Mine was a couple hundred bucks a few years ago. I haven't looked at the new ones, so I can't give you any advice on specific models, just general thoughts about what works for me. Good luck with your search.
 
Ron Ruff
freelance animator.


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From: Mieke Roth <[log in to unmask]>
Date: Mon, Dec 14, 2009 at 5:37 AM
To: [log in to unmask]


Hi Will,

 

This subject is discussed here several times and I will give mostly the same response as I did at those times: it depends on your needs but, if you are able, buy a large 21 inch wacom cintiq. I don’t agree with Rons remark about wrist problems for this one, because it mimics a traditional workplace in the most extreme. So with a cintiq you decide if your movements are wide or small, not the apparatus. I have the large cintiq now for 3 years and I don’t want anything else. Wacom gives you the possibility to buy several types of styluses, but until now I just used the one that came with the cintiq. I also have the smaller 12 inch cintiq. That is a good alternative, especially if I am doodling around, but for continuous work I prefer a larger canvas.

 

The great advantage of the cintiq above all the other wacom tablets is that you are working directly on your monitor, which gives the most natural feeling.

 

As for me: since I have the 21 inch cintiq I completely stopped working in traditional media because the cintiq, together with the right applications like painter, zbrush and such, could replace them all. So be careful! ;-)

 

Mieke


From: SciArt-L Discussion List-for Natural Science Illustration- [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Ron Ruff
Sent: maandag 14 december 2009 6:30
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: [SCIART]


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From: Glendon Mellow <[log in to unmask]>
Date: Mon, Dec 14, 2009 at 5:49 AM
To: [log in to unmask]


Hey Will,

I agree with Mieke even though I haven't ever used a Cintiq.  But they're sweet.

I use a Wacom Intuos 3 like Ron, and I love it.  Mine has a smaller area (4.5x6) and it works great with my 21" monitor. I picked mine up near the end of the life cycle for the model.  Unless you find one used, The Intuos 3 has been replaced by the Intuos 4.  I believe the main differences are greater sensitivity and more programmable keys.

They`re a lot of fun to use.


--
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From: Bruce Bartrug <[log in to unmask]>
Date: Mon, Dec 14, 2009 at 8:57 AM
To: SciArt-L Discussion List-for Natural Science Illustration- <[log in to unmask]>


Forgive my seemingly Luddhite knowledge of Wacom products, but both the Intuos and Cintiq interact with one's computer monitor to create drawings, right?  The Intuos looks like a stand-alone device, which would be awesome for $300.  I would love to have something to carry with me when traveling to easily continue with work in progress, but I'm assuming that would require a laptop plus the Wacom product, right?  Or a laptop with a pressure sensitive screen.  I've heard the latter aren't as sensitive as the Wacom devices though.  Anyone wish to help clarify my not-so-Luddhite mind?

:)b
--
Bruce Bartrug
Nobleboro, Maine, USA
[log in to unmask]
www.brucebartrug.com

The world is a dangerous place, not because of those who do evil, but because of those who look on and do nothing.  - Albert Einstein

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From: Mieke Roth <[log in to unmask]>
Date: Mon, Dec 14, 2009 at 9:15 AM
To: [log in to unmask]


Hi Bruce,

 

The intuos is “just” a tablet that you can use as input device. It works as a mouse but with a pen instead of the mouse. It is not a stand alone. The cintiq is a monitor on which you have the ability to draw with the same sensitivity as the intuos. I also have a tabletpc (indeed for just the thing you are asking this: to travel around) and they are indeed less sensitive than the wacom tablets, although I can do a lot with them. The major problem I have with my tablet is that it has a bad pen and I can also work on it with anything else, from a finger to a real pen if I want to. Although that seems to be cool, it isn’t practical: I just want to use a good pen.

 

Rumour has that apple is coming with a tablet computer one of these days. I really hope that that will be something like the ipod touch but then with a pen.. that would be the greatest thing. Right now you could also consider an e-reader with tough possibility..

Mieke



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From: Bruce Bartrug <[log in to unmask]>
Date: Mon, Dec 14, 2009 at 10:30 AM
To: SciArt-L Discussion List-for Natural Science Illustration- <[log in to unmask]>


Thanks for the update, Mieke.  The problem is I can't seem to justify the expense and weight over a paper tablet and pencil.  Especially since the latter are very seldom stolen and also don't require batteries.  However, I keep an open mind about this sort of thing, and do wish there was a laptop that really performed more like an Intuos.

Bruce

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From: chris gralapp <[log in to unmask]>
Date: Mon, Dec 14, 2009 at 12:58 PM
To: [log in to unmask]


I wanted to chime in with a personal experience.  I had terrible RSI (Repetive Strain Injury) in my wrist from mousing. I turned to the trackball--which really helped a lot (the trackball keeps our hand in a more natural position of function).  I was also using a small Wacom tablet-I switched to a large one, which completed my healing. 

I consulted with ergonomists and RSI experts, and I learned that the smaller the movements one makes while drawing, the more damage accrues.  This is because we are gripping the stylus (or mouse) so precisely over long periods of time, and causing micro-tears in our ligaments and tendons, and the damage mounts up until it becomes chronic.

The larger tablets are preferable ( for me at least ) because I am able to use a fuller range of motion--fingers, hand , wrist, shoulder, which is a more natural way to draw, and spreads the exertion out along this chain, rather than concentrating it in the hand or wrist and alone.  Does this make sense?

For people with a tendency to RSI, I recommend a larger tablet, frequent breaks, fatter styluses (don't grip so tightly) and finding an ergonomic way to position your hand while working.  It is a manifold healing process--and a career threatening problem if not addressed!

My best,

Chris

--

Chris Gralapp

Medical/Scientific Illustration

415.454.6567

[log in to unmask]

www.biolumina.com

 


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From: Anne Runyon <[log in to unmask]>
Date: Mon, Dec 14, 2009 at 1:39 PM
To: [log in to unmask]


This thread has been most interesting. I do not yet (ever?) have one of these digital drawing pads. But appreciate the discussion.
 
Chris writes:The larger tablets are preferable ( for me at least ) because I am able to use a fuller range of motion--fingers, hand , wrist, shoulder, which is a more natural way to draw, and spreads the exertion out along this chain, rather than concentrating it in the hand or wrist and alone.  Does this make sense?
So true. That way of drawing creates beautiful work as well as being more healthy. Glad to learn that the digital tools might allow for this.
Annie
www.annerunyon.com

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From: Gail Guth <[log in to unmask]>
Date: Mon, Dec 14, 2009 at 2:48 PM
To: [log in to unmask]



this sounds right to me, Chris; I tend to draw on a tablet as I do on a big pad of paper.I bought an extra-fat pen, and I like it much better than the smaller one that comes with the tablet; much more comfortable, as you say, I don't seem to grip it as tightly.
I've also found that, when my wrist starts to act up after doing too much computer work in the wrong way, a week or so wearing a wrist brace (I use my pitiful old bowling wrist brace -- and no, it never helped my bowling, which was as bad as my video game skills) and that seems to ease things up quite well.

Gail

Gail Guth
Guth Illustration & Design
139 Lathrop Avenue
Battle Creek, MI  49014-5076
269-963-1311
fax: 269-969-0952




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From: Molly Higgins <[log in to unmask]>
Date: Tue, Dec 15, 2009 at 12:14 AM
To: [log in to unmask]



Hi all, been reading this thread with interest as I just purchased a large Intuos4 about two weeks ago (and incidentally, if anyone is shopping, the best retail prices I found on a reputable site were at Amazon). I had never used one before but recently had one of those 3AM graphic design epiphanies while fighting vector handles with my mouse, ie "there has GOT to be a better way to do this."
 
Setup was really simple. There is a bank of customizable buttons on the side "margin" of the tablet, and you can situate the tablet based on the hand you use--you left-handed people understand just how awesome that feature is! Software included a Corel sketchpad program, an Autodesk sketchpad program, as well as a brush library for photoshop. I haven't played much with either drawing program as I am pretty consumed with Adobe CS3. Fortunately the tablet drivers integrated themselves right into the mix, like other people have said here, the pen is simply a mouse. The only effort on my end was to go into various preference menus and enable pressure-sensitive options.
 
Then there was 3AM epiphany no 2: holy cow, this is like doing real artwork! I've been "drawing" with a mouse all my life and only now have I realized just how unnatural and unlike working in any artistic medium that is. It's definitely unlocked a whole new dimension in Illustrator and Photoshop for me.
 
One unexpected benefit was that it has really, and I mean really, improved my posture. Admittedly I am a sitting duck for computer strain-related injury--I do everything "wrong." In addition to sitting in a better position I am also drawing and navigating in a much more fluid way--not just relying on wrist and index finger (see above, epiphany no. 2).
 
OK, if you can live without cintiq, the prices on these things are not prohibitive. Especially in terms of the benefits it offers over time to workflow and even the creative process. Treat yourself! It IS the holidays, after all! :) Molly

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From: Bruce Bartrug <[log in to unmask]>
Date: Tue, Dec 15, 2009 at 7:11 AM
To: SciArt-L Discussion List-for Natural Science Illustration- <[log in to unmask]>


Thanks, Molly.  I was also thinking it was a great time of year to indulge oneself with a new toy.  Especially with the Intuos, as one can always justify same as being "useful."

:)b

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From: Glendon Mellow <[log in to unmask]>
Date: Tue, Dec 15, 2009 at 7:41 AM
To: [log in to unmask]


Another advantage of the Intuos is the portability in your studio:  the cord is kind of long, and you can lean back and prop it on your lap like a sketchbook.

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From: Linda Feltner <[log in to unmask]>
Date: Tue, Dec 15, 2009 at 7:57 AM
To: [log in to unmask]


Hi All:
For future archive reference, how does one go back and search for this thread, when it is blank in the subject.
This is a thread that I would try to find at a later date in the archives, can't absorb the info right now. But just curious as to how to search the archives. (especially when we are asked to delete the previous letters so the entry will be smaller).
Best,
Lnda
_______________________
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P.O. Box 325
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(520) 803-0538
www.lindafeltner.com




--
Bruce Bartrug
Nobleboro, Maine, USA
[log in to unmask]
www.brucebartrug.com

The world is a dangerous place, not because of those who do evil, but because of those who look on and do nothing.  - Albert Einstein

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