Bob, a couple of your Ataenius have large punctures on the stripes, but not equally large punctures in one row on the intervals.

The closest I could find so far is probably Strigodius robinsoni, but this one has two rows of large punctures, separated by sharp carina. My mystery elytra have just one row of large punctures on equally elevated intervals.

This elytral sculpture is so distinct that I would guess anybody on this list would recognize it, if it were a scarab.

Frank

 

From: Scarab Beetle Taxonomy Discussion List [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Bob Woodruff
Sent: Tuesday, July 23, 2013 8:25 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: Pleistocene scarab fragments?

 

Frank:

I still believe it is an Aphodiine. Please compare to some of the SEM's in my "Scarabs of Florida" volume. Bob Woodruff

 

In a message dated 7/22/2013 7:26:33 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time, [log in to unmask] writes:

Max et al.,
Thanks for your comments from end June. A few fieldtrips kept me away from those Pleistocene particles, but now I have to get back to them.
Max, I sent a picture of that short fragment because it showed the surface sculpture nicely. There is a longer specimen (attached) with the same surface sculpture which does not look like a histeroid or omaliine, unfortunately. It still does not look like any scarab I know.
I have four of those fragments which I now will exclude from my manuscript. It is just a bit unsatisfactory to exclude it from scarabaeoids when there is no more plausible alternative. Or is there meanwhile?
As for the size, each of my pictures should contain a 1 mm scale. I see the scale in the attached picture of my outgoing mail I sent to the list. I also see the scale in the attached photo.
These particles are pretty small.
Cheers

Frank


Dr. Frank-T. Krell
Curator of Entomology
Commissioner, International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature
Chair, ICZN ZooBank Committee
Department of Zoology
Denver Museum of Nature & Science
2001 Colorado Boulevard
Denver, CO 80205-5798 USA
[log in to unmask]
Phone: (+1) (303) 370-8244
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http://www.dmns.org/science/museum-scientists/frank-krell
lab page: http://www.dmns.org/krell-lab

The Denver Museum of Nature & Science aspires to create a community of critical thinkers who understand the lessons of the past and act as responsible stewards of the future.



-----Original Message-----
From: Scarab Beetle Taxonomy Discussion List [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Max Barclay
Sent: Saturday, June 22, 2013 6:51 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: Pleistocene scarab fragments?

Look at the apex of the elytra.. that looks like an elytron that doesn't cover the whole abdomen, i.e. leaves some segments visible from above. I have no idea how big they are of course, but I would have started with Staphyliniformia- some histeroid or omaliine or something.. that doesn't say scarab or weevil to me..

M



Maxwell V. L. Barclay
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Entomology: Coleoptera & Hemiptera
Department of Life Sciences
Natural History Museum
London SW7 5BD
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________________________________
From: Scarab Beetle Taxonomy Discussion List [[log in to unmask]] on behalf of Paul Schoolmeesters [[log in to unmask]]
Sent: 22 June 2013 13:34
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: Pleistocene scarab fragments?

It looks a bit like Euparixoides, but these are South American species

Paul Schoolmeesters
Langeveldstraat, 23
B-3020 Herent
Belgium
e-mail: [log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>
Coprophagous Scarabaeidae of the world
http://www.datascaraebaeoidea.net/Index.html
http://www.museum.unl.edu/research/entomology/workers/PSchoolmeesters.htm

From: Scarab Beetle Taxonomy Discussion List [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Frank T. Krell
Sent: samedi 22 juin 2013 00:40
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Pleistocene scarab fragments?

Hi all,

I am a little bit lost, so it's time to ask the list, I guess.
I am working on scarab fragments of a Pleistocene site of Colorado. Most of them are Aphodius heads (or Aphodius s.l. heads, for the splitters). I also got a few elytral fragments with a pretty distinct sculpture, consisting of broad deep, largely punctured stripes and not much broader, elevated, equally largely punctured intervals (see attached photo).
I thought I have seen such elytra before, but cannot remember. I got them as possible scarabs, but I am struggling to find a North American scarab with such elytra. Could it be something else? I cc to Mike Ivie because he knows all those little families that nobody else knows (or are you on the Scarbs-L list, Mike?).
Any ideas? Thanks!

Frank


Dr. Frank-T. Krell
Curator of Entomology
Commissioner, International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature Chair, ICZN ZooBank Committee Department of Zoology Denver Museum of Nature & Science
2001 Colorado Boulevard
Denver, CO 80205-5798 USA
[log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>
Phone: (+1) (303) 370-8244
Fax: (+1) (303) 331-6492
http://www.dmns.org/science/museum-scientists/frank-krell
lab page: http://www.dmns.org/krell-lab

The Denver Museum of Nature & Science aspires to create a community of critical thinkers who understand the lessons of the past and act as responsible stewards of the future.