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How big is the critter and what kind of plant is it on?  Did you see it moving? Could you see its legs or did it just move without you being able to see them? I can see some rudmentary prolegs in your pic around the fourth segment or so and some anal ones too.  I am not a lepidopterist by any means but may be able to get an answer from one if you want.  Most of the dagger moths I have seen are more hairy rather than just setae but I have heard that some don't have much hair.

The head capsule didn't look like a skipper to me or the legs from what I could see.

Your photo was beautiful

Carolyn Withrow
  ----- Original Message ----- 
  From: Bruce Bartrug 
  To: [log in to unmask] 
  Sent: Friday, September 06, 2013 7:26 PM
  Subject: Re: [SCIART] OT: need an entomologist


  I wondered the same, Julie.  But I need a better lepodoptebiblio.


  :)b




  On Thu, Sep 5, 2013 at 10:48 PM, Julie Kulak <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

    I'm going to take a stab at it: either a variety of dagger moth (Acronicta) OR skipper (family Hesperiidae). Do let us know when someone who really knows caterpillars IDs it!
    Julie



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