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I thought I'd answer the question of a similar network in a different
response. This is something I'm planning on posting on Symbiartic in some
form in October, by the way.

Short answer: there is no perfectly similar network with the reach and
power of successful Facebook Pages and self-promotion. Personally, I think
Facebook is showing its age, and like mySpace and AOL is becoming
increasingly awkward with each "improvement". But the fact remains, it's
the internet giant for a certain type of conversationally-long link and
image-sharing post.
In my job at INVIVO, a few times now one of our Facebook posts will take
off like a rocket and get tens of thousands of views in an afternoon.

So if Facebook's Terms turn you off, fair enough. But you are cutting out a
potentially huge audience, so it's important to be aware of that.

The best strategy in my opinion for promoting yourself on social networks
is to *Pick 2*. Pick 2 networks to devote your efforts.

Networks also vary in terms of content length. So I say pick one long and
one short.

Long form posting:

   - Facebook
   - Google+  (which by the way, is absolutely fantastic on mobile and
   tablets, a powerful way to build new audiences)
   - LinkedIn


Short form posting:

   - Twitter
   - Instagram
   - Tumblr

If  was only picking two and wanted to avoid Facebook, I would use G+ and
Twitter.

Runners up: G+ and Tumblr.

I would not devote efforts to LinkedIn. I have never ever received an art
job that way and I've been there over 5 years. It's a business card or
resume for certain industries.

My 2 cents. I plan on having a lot more in the upcoming Symbiartic post in
October.  :-)

Glendon

--
Glendon Mellow
Art in Awe of Science
http://www.glendonmellow.com

Find me on
*Symbiartic, the art+science
blog<http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/symbiartic>
*
on the Scientific American Blog Network


On 13 September 2013 10:35, Glendon Mellow <[log in to unmask]>wrote:

> Thanks Bruce!
>
> Facebook's main aim with these new rules is both less sinister and more
> "what the hell?" in my opinion.
>
> A lot of what they are doing under these terms plays out like this
> hypothetical.
>
>
>    - I read a Slate article about let's say, humanities education,
>    through a link a Linda put up on her feed. I click "Like" on her post about
>    the article.
>    - Bruce logs into Facebook, and in his feed there's now a link to
>    Slate, saying something like, "Your friend Glendon Likes Slate". But the
>    image and picture are not necessarily the one I just read from Linda. It
>    could be a more up-to-date article Slate has posted. And maybe something I
>    don't agree with or like at all, like an article called "Why Republicans
>    are right about Obama" or something.
>
> So if you have your art on a Facebook Page, and someone clicks like on it,
> a different piece of art from your fan page may appear in other people's
> feeds advertising the Page.
>
> It is supposed to encourage browsing. You're friends with these people,
> presumably you have similar interests. Where it falls apart is in showing
> content that is not exactly what you clicked Like on. I may enjoy Bruce's
> bird painting and abhor his landscapes (I don't, just giving an example.)
> So Facebook has been called out on this in a number of places since they
> made this change, because it's not really working.
>
> Yes: the language sounds more sinister than that and they *could* do
> other things with your work. But basically they want to repackage and
> distribute/re-size and share links with your friends based on your
> activity.
>
> I don't think it's a big deal, but it's an awkward system at the moment.
>
> Glendon
>
> --
> Glendon Mellow
> Art in Awe of Science
> http://www.glendonmellow.com
>
> Find me on
> *Symbiartic, the art+science blog<http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/symbiartic>
> *
> on the Scientific American Blog Network
>
>
> On 12 September 2013 21:52, Bruce Bartrug <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
>> As are many.
>>
>> b
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> On Thu, Sep 12, 2013 at 6:40 PM, Smith Will (Toowong) <
>> [log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>
>>> Thanks Bruce. Yes, Iím interested in something similar to facebook to
>>> keep in touch with people, where they treat their customers better.****
>>>
>>> Cheers,****
>>>
>>>               Will****
>>>
>>> ** **
>>>
>>>  ________________________________________________
>>
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>
>

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