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Hello Carlos et al:

Just a note here: I often found scorpions in my live pitfall traps in the
Amazon, particularly in the drier areas. Even more frequently, I would find
nymphal assassin bugs, actually in the process of preying on a dung beetle.

Interesting stuff, folks!

Kevina


On Thu, Sep 26, 2013 at 10:08 PM, Alejandro Lopera <
[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Margareth, have you seen them prey near the traps? Wonder how they prey on
> the beetles, if it is like Apiomera or how,
>
> A
>
> On 26/09/2013, at 20:11, Margareth Brummermann <[log in to unmask]
> <mailto:[log in to unmask]>> wrote:
>
> Canthon imitator here in Arizona is regular prey for Diogmites (Hanging
> Thief Robberflies) and scorpions can be seen hunting scarabs of similar
> size. So why shouldn't they be able to penetrate the exoskeleton of your
> dung beetles? They know where the week spots are.
>
> ________________________________
> From: "Carlos Flechtmann" <[log in to unmask]<mailto:
> [log in to unmask]>>
> To: [log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>
> Sent: Thursday, September 26, 2013 3:07:01 PM
> Subject: On Scorpions and Dung Beetles
>
> Dear colleagues
>
> While excavating some dung beetle galleries, I stumbled across some
> scorpions
> inside, some adults and some young. Is this any common?
>
> Would they be there just for shelter, or trying to feed on dung beetles?
> I find it
> hard to believe scorpions would be able to penetrate the exosqueleton of
> adults,
> and young are usually protected inside capsules.
>
> Any thoughts?
>
> Thanks,
> Carlos
>
> --
> Department of Plant Protection
> FEIS/UNESP
> Av. Brasil, 56
> 15385-000 - Ilha Solteira - SP
> BRAZIL
> Phone: +55 18 3743-1142
> FAX: +55 18 3743-1176
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> Skype: carlos_flechtmann
>
>


-- 
Kevina Vulinec, PhD
Professor, Wildlife Ecology
Department of Agriculture and Natural Resources
Delaware State University
Dover, Delaware 19901-2277
(302) 857-6457
Fax: (302) 857-6455
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