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Margareth

I appreciate your comments. In the open it is one thing, but in rather
tight dung beetle galleries, I cannot see how would a scorpion be
able to target/find/aim any weak spots. Do you see what I am saying?

Thanks,
Carlos


On 9/26/2013 10:11 PM, Margareth Brummermann wrote:
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Canthon imitator here in Arizona is regular prey for Diogmites (Hanging Thief Robberflies) and scorpions can be seen hunting scarabs of similar size. So why shouldn't they be able to penetrate the exoskeleton of your dung beetles? They know where the week spots are.


From: "Carlos Flechtmann" <[log in to unmask]>
To: [log in to unmask]
Sent: Thursday, September 26, 2013 3:07:01 PM
Subject: On Scorpions and Dung Beetles

Dear colleagues

While excavating some dung beetle galleries, I stumbled across some
scorpions
inside, some adults and some young. Is this any common?

Would they be there just for shelter, or trying to feed on dung beetles?
I find it
hard to believe scorpions would be able to penetrate the exosqueleton of
adults,
and young are usually protected inside capsules.

Any thoughts?

Thanks,
Carlos

--
Department of Plant Protection
FEIS/UNESP
Av. Brasil, 56
15385-000 - Ilha Solteira - SP
BRAZIL
Phone: +55 18 3743-1142
FAX: +55 18 3743-1176
http://www.agr.feis.unesp.br/cahf/home
Skype: carlos_flechtmann

-- 
Department of Plant Protection
FEIS/UNESP
Av. Brasil, 56
15385-000 - Ilha Solteira - SP
BRAZIL
Phone: +55 18 3743-1142
FAX: +55 18 3743-1176
http://www.agr.feis.unesp.br/cahf/home
Skype: carlos_flechtmann