On 10/1/2013 2:15 AM, Stefan li Rous wrote:
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You said:
<<< AND they (medieval) measured everything by volume which mucked with the systems and made the smelting technology >>>

What are you basing this statement on? I think I remember numerous examples of both food items and fine metals being measured by weight.

The Mastery and Uses of Fire in Antiquity Paperback

by J. E. Rehder
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<<< I so want to smelt some Iron. >>>

So what is keeping you from doing it? I know it has been done multiple times at Pennsic. I attended one smelting job, or at least the firing up and the starting of the smelting.  I don't think I got back the next day to see the result when the smelter was cracked open.

<<<  About ready to throw in the towel on finding ore and buying some Iron oxide used in clay glazes ant trying to make some fake ore. >>>

Why would you want to make "fake ore" when the real stuff is available?

I have been looking for the real stuff for 3 years now. No luck on finding anything at any price until about 3 hours ago with Mark Green,   Another offer only an hour ago,  and now you.  I am feeling that this must be the time it is supposed to happen.
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Here is one story I saved about a smelting experiment at Pennsic. Unfortunately, this particular story is a bit short on technical details, but that wasn't the reason that this story was related.
P-tale-MWIFO-art (23K) 8/26/96 Making Wrought Iron from Ore at Pennsic 24.
http://www.florilegium.org/files/PENNSIC/P-tale-MWIFO-art.html

I am on the East Kingdom Metalsmiths list. Would you like me to ask there whether anyone has a source of iron ore and in what grades?

Absolutely, I have spent so long not finding any sources that I want a list of possibility in case some fail.


 
 I'm not sure which kingdom William the Smith is in, but I think he was part of the group running the smelter that I watched at Pennsic. Stefan On Oct 1, 2013, at 12:43 AM, Jerry Harder <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
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He didn't say much about the pieces of metal he put into the crucible.  I assume they were from the bloom iron- the spongy mass of glass and iron that is the normal product of smelting back then.  Repeated forge welding this mass produced wrought iron which had the slag inclusions they were talking about that were in common swords of the time.. This Iron can have any level of carbon content which is controlled by the % iron in the ore and the amount or ratio of charcoal to ore ratio (by weight) and probably by some of the dynamic particulars of the furnace dimensions.  So How did he (and they) determine how much carbon to put in and what was his final carbon content of the sword he recreated? They didn't say.  Of course in medieval times, they could not have known this type of data, AND they (medieval) measured everything by volume which mucked with the systems and made the smelting technology not very transportable. As far as proof of Frankish origin, I!
  think t
he video sa!
 id that the word Ulfberht was of Frankish origin, but that how and where they were made and by who (over 200 yeas time) was the big misery.      - I so want to smelt some Iron.  About ready to throw in the towel on finding ore and buying some Iron oxide used in clay glazes ant trying to make some fake ore.
Master Gerald
--------
THLord Stefan li Rous    Barony of Bryn Gwlad    Kingdom of Ansteorra
   Mark S. Harris           Austin, Texas          [log in to unmask]
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