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Julie's job does not sound exactly like a Club logo, but even if it is, I would say for the likely 
small fee she will get, she can put a few conditions on it's use.

1. Assuming you want to give them use for all merchandise and publicity for their organization, 
require it be limited to their organization. They can not resell the reproduction rights or loan it 
to other people, groups, or companies.

2. You have the right to resell it or let other people use the mushroom art, sans whatever logo and 
text these people plan to add that personalizes it to there organization.

3. You keep the original to sell or donate as a fine art piece.

If they want to outright own all the rights to the art to use or resell reproduction rights, that is 
a "Buyout" and you should multiply your fee by 3x. More if you are working at a "discount" because 
you like them.

The idea of tracking their sales to get a royalty is not worth your effort for such a small group. 
Let them knock them selves out and make as much money for their club as they can- you got paid a 
decent hourly rate (right?) and you hopefully have the above conditions attached as a break on 
obscene exploitation that they never intended to happen, but did anyway.

Britt





On 12/11/13 3:37 PM, Maia Sanders wrote:
> Hi Julie,
>
> When it's a logo, the only right I reserve is for my portfolio and personal promotion- I know
> stories of people charging very little for a design for a small company that becomes giant, like
> Nike- but my thought is that as long as I am getting paid a fair hourly rate, that's OK by me when I
> have a winning company's logo in my own portfolio (not that I do, but I can hope!)
>
> . However, on the rare occasion when I have a regular illustration contract, and in my art-for-sale
> work,  I reserve all the rights I can manage.  I figure the mushroom graphic for tshirts etc. as
> sort of a logo, so I would just treat it that way if it were me.
>
> Yes, I send along hours it will take, for each stage, I figure the client likes to see where the
> money breakdown is- or at least, I like to justify my price!
>
>   I think watermarks is a good idea for you, since I am assuming the work will be in your full-color
> painting style- the logo I had stolen was from an approved final sketch, that then the company
> backed out of paying and cancelled the contract- rendered into screenprint-ready logo-style by a
> less-than competent, but free, artist- I discovered later it was the school owner's wife.  At least
> I learned I need to charge at the different stages from that, so I count it as "continuing education" :)
>
> Happy to help, I know how confusing it was when I started getting these kind of jobs.  Now, it's a
> small but satisfying sideline- it is curiously rewarding to see my picture randomly around town on
> people's jackets, tshirts and bumper stickers.
>
> Maia
>
>
>
>         On Wednesday, December 11, 2013, Julie Himes wrote:
>
>             Hi All,
>
>             I am new to science illustration, so I'm just learning all of the ins and outs of how to
>             sell artwork and take commissions. I have been asked by a club (150 members or so) to
>             illustrate some mushrooms for their T-shirts, bags, mugs, and probably for their
>             website. The illustration would likely take me about 14 hours to make. They would like
>             to have rights to the image (I would not get a percentage of each shirt sale). What is a
>             reasonable amount to ask for? While I would be selling my time, materials, and the
>             rights to my illustration, I also know that they are a non-profit club.
>
>             Thanks for your help!
>
>             - Julie Himes
>

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