Hi Tricia
Look at

Efland, A. D. (1990). A history of art education. new york: Teachers College Press.

 

Also, the following are exerpts from my dissertation:
"Massachusetts passed the country’s first “Drawing Act” in 1870, which required that drawing be included as one of the nine essential subjects taught in all state public schools.  By 1898, newly-hired teachers in New York were expected to pass a proficiency exam in drawing skills (New York Times, 1898). "
"...students studying the natural sciences at North Carolina State University (then, the North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts) at the turn of the 20th century were required to take drawing classes for one hour daily – five credit hours per semester. The purpose of this drawing course was to “learn to observe and become familiar with the little details incident to agricultural pursuits” (Catalogue of the NC College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, 1890). " - Landin 2012
 
Jennifer

On Sun, Dec 15, 2013 at 10:28 AM, Tricia Cassady <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
Hi All,

I was just wondering if any of you knew of any articles or research about science students being required to take classes in art during the 1800's to the early 1900's.

Somehow I remember there being information about this but I can't put my finger on it.

Thank you ahead of time

Tricia Cassady, President
GNSI- New England Chapter

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--
Jennifer Landin, Ph.D.
Department of Biology
NC State University
Box 7617, Raleigh NC 27695
919-513-0241
www4.ncsu.edu/~jmlandin

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