Thanks Natalya:
Yes, it's popular and effective. 

I've just not tried to coach someone using INDD, through a process that I'm not familiar with. I would think that the whole Creative Design Suite would be very similar in handling effects, but this is a mare's nest. INDD is just not handling these links like AI does.  I think  could be overlooking something quite simple, and will hand-smack myself when I figure it out. ha. 

I can see where your method does achieve the results. I will do an experiment to see if it works for this project. 

Many thanks. 
Linda
_____________________
Linda M. Feltner Artist, LLC
P.O. Box 325
Hereford, AZ 85615
(520) 803-0538







On Dec 6, 2013, at 8:37 AM, Natalya Zahn wrote:

Linda,

The effect you're trying to achieve must be a popular signage style right now - I'm currently working on a large project with very similar image set-up. To complicate things, some of my panels have a washy color render added under the line, but all over a dark color ground… it has proven exceptionally challenging to get the actual artwork execution, then digital file prep organized in such a way as to give the designers exactly what they need… I feel your pain!

I am thankfully not dealing with InDesign, but most of the creative suite has similar layer style options available, and I'm wondering if the following might help out in regards to maintaining an editable spot color layer for the designer to work with:

I am creating my line work in white (it starts black pen ink, but gets inverted in PS) - it has the background knocked out then it's placed over the correct colored ground, and there is a THIRD, color layer that goes on top of the line. The color layer is set to "Darker Color" in the layer style palette, and if the linework is white, it appears to "colorize" it, without effecting the color of the background. I haven't tested this in InDesign, but if you're able to import your linework, with transparent ground, as white line (whatever file type works best), perhaps you could try creating a solid color shape to lie over the artwork, which you can apply the above layer style to. This way, the designer could continually fiddle with the color to her specs, without having to go back into the drawing file.

*I don't have a clue how the above set up effects ability to print, but it sounds like you're still at a preliminary stage, well before production…?

I am following this thread eagerly either way - the tips that are being discussed may very well enhance my own current project process… great stuff.

Cheers,
-Natalya


On Dec 6, 2013, at 10:12 AM, Linda Feltner wrote:

Hi Deb:
Yes, that is correct, it's a banner-like entry sign. Dark background, the sketches are watermarked (80% appx) behind large lettering that is very light in color.

you may drop an image file TIF grayscale and then have it take on a specfic pantone or ink color within INDesign.

Yes, grayscale works beautifully. but she can't colorize it and maintain transparent background. I've not gotten it to do that in my experiments, either. 
Maybe I'll try with TIFF again. I think I've given her PSD files. 

I have scanned sketchbook images. These are the draft images. The final images have yet to be drawn, but I have to provide an image document where yet ANOTHER graphic designer in charge of pre-press can just substitute my draft FPO file for the high res file. That scares me a LOT. 
Especially I am unfamiliar with how INDD incorporates these documents. 

If I can just give her a grayscale document, and all the colorizing is done in the INDD document, then I think the substitution could go smoothly. I do this all the time in AI and PSD. But it's just not the same in INDD. or else I'm just not knowledgeable in-depth in INDD>.

I've not done a duotone. 

I was going to ask if it was spot color or full color, but my guess is full color CMYK. 

Yes, I'm trying to work within  her system she's already developed, in order to keep the colors consistent. I don't care what it looks like on screen, she is designating either PMS colors or color profiles for CMYK colors. So it should at least be consistent when printed. 

Many thanks!
Linda
_____________________
Linda M. Feltner Artist, LLC
P.O. Box 325
Hereford, AZ 85615
(520) 803-0538







On Dec 6, 2013, at 7:43 AM, Deb Haines wrote:

Linda is the artwork you provided a scan of a graphite sket ch? From what you describe the designer has a colored background and they want the sketch instead of a grayscale to strip out to another ink color, is that correct?

There are two possibilities: if I remember correctly you may drop an image file TIF grayscale and then have it take on a specfic pantone or ink color within INDesign. If you have already created this in AI or PSD and the sketch is on one layer and your colors another layer you may be able to create two separate files. Or if the designer can provide the specific pantone color you csn create the grayscale graphite drawing to a duotone PSD and export the PSD as a CMYK TIF. Again not seeing the actual desin, not knowing if this is a spot color or full color print process changes how you woukd troubleshoot. Also if monitors, scanners and printers are not color calibrated and color profiles are not saved with your file there will be a tendecy in color shifts within printing.

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android



From: Linda Feltner <[log in to unmask]>;
To: <[log in to unmask]>;
Subject: Re: [SCIART] question about InDesign
Sent: Fri, Dec 6, 2013 2:21:43 PM

Well, that's the problem, It's NOT my call. I know how to do this in PSD and AI (EASY PEASY), but INDD is not handling transparency the same.
 I"m working with someone who is finalizing panels for a huge project, and the whole project is done that way. This is one small part. 

I know what INDD is supposed to be used for, I have used it for book and brochure design. But not this issue. 
It's out of my hands, but I have to give her a file that she can go on to manipulate, and so far she can't work with my PSD files. And if that's not complicated enough, she is working with my pencil drafts, which will later next year,  will have to be replaced (by ANOTHER design firm) with my original drawing, that wont be drawn until next year. 

I'm trying to come up with a fool proof file that I can give her that she can colorize. 

Thanks! I appreciate the thoughts.
Linda
_____________________
Linda M. Feltner Artist, LLC
P.O. Box 325
Hereford, AZ 85615
(520) 803-0538







On Dec 5, 2013, at 5:44 PM, OC Carlisle wrote:

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