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Hi,   Jan 4, 2014

I hope this doesn't come too late for Tricia Cassady's question. 
Here are some references that might be useful:   

Sally Gregory Kohlstedt, Teaching Children Science: Hands-On Nature Study in North America 1890-1930/  (University of Chicago Press, 2010). Although there is very little on drawing and art as part of nature study, the notes should lead you to lots of material. Kohlstedt includes a 1919 advertisement for "Outline Drawings of Common Animals," drawn by Louis Agassiz Fuertes, sold by Comstock Publishing Company in Ithaca NY ( figure 28, p 219). Primary sources are likely to be digitized at http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org 

 Emanuel D. Rudolf's Studies in the History of North American Botany with an Appendix on the Relationship between Science and Religion, R.L. Stuckey and W.R. Burk, eds. 2000. ISBN 1-889878-05-7 (paper, no price given). 376 pp. Botanical Research Institute of Texas, Fort Worth, Texas, USA. I haven't seen this myself, but here's a review/obituary
http://www.botany.org/bsa/psb/2002/psb48-2.html#Emanuel

My own paper (mentioned before on SCIART), "When the botanist can't draw: The case of Linnaeus," INTERDISCIPLINARY SCIENCE REVIEWS, 2004, VOL. 29, NO. 3, 248-258  alludes to an older colleague's unhappy experience with required drawings in botany class. (See also Isabelle Charmantier 's excellent critique, "Carl Linnaeus and the Visual Representation of Nature," Historical Studies in the Natural Sciences,41:4 (2011), 7-25.) 

Alphonso Wood's late 19th century textbooks might be useful. In 

"The American botanist and florist : including lessons in the structure, life, and growth of plants  he writes Specimens of leaves, stems, roots, fruit, flowers, etc., in unlimited supply are re-quisite during the whole course. In the absence of the living, let the dried specimens of the herbarium be consulted. Crayon sketches upon the blackboard, if truthful, are always good for displaying minute or obscure forms. In the city, classes in Botany may employ, at small expense, a collector to supply them daily with fresh specimens from the country. " 

http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/15543#page/17/mode/1up

Thanks, Judith, for the link to JenniferLandin's thesis, "Perceptual Drawing as a Learning Tool in a College Biology  Laboratory." Thanks, Tania, for the Grolier Club exhibition catalogue reference.

Karen


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Date:    Mon, 16 Dec 2013 05:40:56 -0500
From:    Judith Stoffer <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: Art education required in the sciences during the 1800's to 1900's

Here is a PDF of Jennifer's thesis. (I'm presuming it's the final version.)
http://repository.lib.ncsu.edu/ir/bitstream/1840.16/6830/1/etd.pdf

Judy

On Mon, Dec 16, 2013 at 1:00 AM, SCIART-L automatic digest system <
[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Date:    Sun, 15 Dec 2013 12:05:38 -0500
> From:    Kathryn Killackey <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: Art education required in the sciences during the 1800's to
> 1900's
>
> Dear Jennifer,
>
> Your dissertation sounds very interesting. Would you send along its full
> citation so I can track it down?
>
> best,
>
> Kathryn
>


--
Judith A. Stoffer
Baltimore, MD 21218 USA
443/676.8883

When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest
of the world.
-John Muir, naturalist, explorer, and writer (1838-1914)

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Date:    Mon, 16 Dec 2013 07:34:01 -0800
From:    Tania Marien <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: Art education required in the sciences during the 1800s to 1900s

Tricia,

In 2006 the Grolier Club in New York had an exhibition titled, Teaching America to Draw: Instructional Manuals and Ephemera, 1794-1925. It featured rare books from the Special Collections at Penn State. A booklet was published in conjunction with the exhibition. It is a bibliography of rare drawing books, not a full-blown catalog. The holdings of the featured collection are in Penn State's online catalog. Click on the first link below to learn more. 

Teaching America to Draw: Instructional Manuals and Ephemera 1794-1925
Penn State University
https://www.libraries.psu.edu/psul/speccolls/rbm/andersonellis.html

Exhibition Booklet
http://cat.libraries.psu.edu/uhtbin/cgisirsi/?ps=PEyi5hOTjy/UP-PAT/38060208/9#

Grolier Club Exhibition (May 16 - July 29, 2006)
http://www.grolierclub.org/default.aspx?p=v35ListDocument&ID=755383292&listid=11459&listitemid=123173&ssid=166764&dpageid=&listname=Past%20Exhibitions


Tania


ArtPlantae LLC
ArtPlantae Books
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(951) 289-5530
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> Date:    Sun, 15 Dec 2013 10:28:28 -0500
> From:    Tricia Cassady <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Art education required in the sciences during the 1800's to 1900's
>
> Hi All,
>
> I was just wondering if any of you knew of any articles or research about
> science students being required to take classes in art during the 1800's to
> the early 1900's.
>
> Somehow I remember there being information about this but I can't put my
> finger on it.
>
> Thank you ahead of time
>
> Tricia Cassady, President
> GNSI- New England Chapter
>
 

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