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Once again, Franz, you surprise me. Very interesting concepts. Thanks.

Eleanor Deyeson

On Sun, 16 Feb 2014 12:27:09 -0600, john heitman <[log in to unmask]> wrote:


>Now, as to my interest in the passage.....   Salt comes in a rocks, or in
>gravel if you have a lot of it.  larger towns pave their streets to stave
>off the mud. Spreading gravel is the equivalent of paving.  If you have a
>large salt mine to hand (like you know, the Dead Sea, maybe), it is easier
>to mine the salt than it is the limestone, and break it into gravel. This
>is very dirty salt, pretty much the equivalent of our road salt, and
>definitely not fit for eating, or preserving food FOR eating. For that
>purpose it has to be washed and refined several times.  That refining is
>what makes salt so expensive.  This raw stuff is literally dirt cheap.
> Road engineers will use whatever gravel is closest and easiest to access.
> Sand stone, limestone, granite, broken reef, coal cinders, what ever they
>can get cheaply.
>
>Why would Jesus have used this visual if the common culture was not
>familiar with the image?
>
>From an engineering perspective, this has some really interesting
>characteristics.  Rain does not percolate down through the soil like it
>does here.  It evaporates back UP out of the soil in that region.  So the
>cycle would be....  Salt the road, rain falls and dissolves the salt,
>enters the earth to a depth of no more than 18", then evaporates leaving
>the salt behind.  The Salt then hardens the soil, creating a hard surface
>that is more impervious to rainfall than the surrounding ground.  IOW, it
>creates a hard pack road NATURALLY!!!!!    in *my* book, that's pure
>f*****g GENIUS!
>
>Cultural support for this theory comes from a practice distinct to the
>region.  EVERYbody goes barefoot everywhere around the world. Indians,
>American Indians, Polynesians, Greeks, Romans, Egyptians, Mayan.
> Everybody.  But the ONLY place that has a ritual foot washing with oil is
>the Holy Land.
>
> Normal dust does not dry out the feet severely.  Salt dust will cripple
>the feet in less than a week because it will dry the skin and make serious
>bleeding cracks.  The only way to correct that is to wash the salt dust
>off, and rub oil into the skin.  And this practice is documented not once,
>but several times in the gospels. Mary does it to Jesus. Jesus does it to
>the disciples, widows to saints.
>
>At least, that is MY take on it.
>