Folks,

I think Michael Wall has nailed it. These are Pepsis pupae.

Lynn

 

From: Lynn Kimsey
Sent: Tuesday, February 04, 2014 9:38 AM
To: 'Michael Wall'
Subject: RE: mystery insect? object

 

You know I wondered about these being hymenopteran. I bet you’re right! There are a number of Pompilid species there and one Pepsis.

Lynn

 

From: Michael Wall [mailto:[log in to unmask]]
Sent: Tuesday, February 04, 2014 9:30 AM
To: Lynn Kimsey; [log in to unmask]
Subject: RE: mystery insect? object

 

Lynn,

 

I found something like this is Arizona once and dissected it to find what I thought might be a Pepsis pupae. Scroll to the bottom of this page and look at the four-paned image. http://www.iibce.edu.uy/tarantulas/ingles/

 

 

Michael

 

From: Entomological Collections Network Listserve [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Lynn Kimsey
Sent: Tuesday, February 04, 2014 9:15 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: mystery insect? object

 

Even the intact ones are hollow but with dried material on the inside. Others look hatched and have the end popped off, much like fly puparia. Yet others have small round parasitoid-like exit holes.

 

Lynn

 

From: David Notton [mailto:[log in to unmask]]
Sent: Tuesday, February 04, 2014 9:11 AM
To: Lynn Kimsey
Subject: RE: mystery insect? object

 

What’s inside?

David

David Notton

 

From: Entomological Collections Network Listserve [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Lynn Kimsey
Sent: 04 February 2014 17:08
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: mystery insect? object

 

Folks,

We recently turned up these relatively large objects in the Algodones Dunes in southeastern California. They look insect in origin to me but they are very large and frankly we’re stumped. Any ideas?

 

Lynn Kimsey

 

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