Bruce, thanks for this--I did marvel that two of our three hummers were able to fly again after being stunned--and it makes perfect sense that their lightness can be their salvation.  Altho, at the speeds that they zoom around, pure physics would dictate that even a light little body at these speeds would have a force large enough to sustain injury.  They are remarkably resilient.
Yes, they are precious little gems!  we have mostly Anna's and Ruby-throateds, and occasionally Allen's.  I know when Spring has come when they do their dive-bombing dance complete with a shriek and the end of the swoop.  I was interested to learn that the shriek is produced by their feathers and not a vocalization.

Chris


On 3/3/2014 11:07 AM, Bruce Bartrug wrote:
[log in to unmask]" type="cite">
Something on the outside usually helps, as it breaks the continuity of the window.  We've used falcon silhouettes and see-through maple leaves, as indicated above.  These are mostly effective but not entirely.  Chickadees feed directly underneath the falcons, for example, and doves being chased by accipiters kill themselves on windows with either.  The only sure (almost sure?) thing is strands of something very obvious strung across the window on the outside.  A screen, for example :).  Some have used colored yarn, spaced to alert birds but able to be seen through from indoors.

Hummers usually only knock themselves out as they are so light weight.  I retrieved a couple from the floor inside a birding lodge in Ecuador once.  They were fighting one another (if hummingbirds were the size of crows, it wouldn't be safe to go into the woods) and flew through on open door and into the window on the inside.  They recovered after a short while and one tiny little jewel sat on my thumb for several minutes, even allowing me to carefully stroke his nape.  Precious little beasts.

Best of luck,
b


On Mon, Mar 3, 2014 at 12:05 PM, Patricia Savage <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
I don't know if this is an option, but I don't wash my windows close to the feeders very often anymore and that has really cut down on the bird strikes. Maybe find a way to dirty them up?

 

Cheers,

Patricia Savage

 

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On 3/3/14 11:53 AM, Chris Gralapp wrote:
I have a most distressing problem--I just installed a big, brand new bay window, and have had three hummingbirds hit it.  I think it reflects the sky and the mountains, and the mirror effect deceives the little guys to fly into it.  I moved my feeder about ten feet away, to keep them on the other side of the yard, if possible, but they still hit the window.  It's just heartbreaking. 

I know there are decals for deterring bird strikes--any suggestions for the most effective?

Chris



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The world is a dangerous place, not because of those who do evil, but because of those who look on and do nothing.  - Albert Einstein

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