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I have one rule that governs all my time donations - is it a not-for-profit that I wholeheartedly support? 

Then I ask three questions: Would I donate that equivalent amount of money (that they would otherwise pay me) to their cause? Can I reuse the art for profit or other purposes? If the answer to all three of those is 'yes', then IF I have time and passion for the cause, I may help them out. And part of my conversation with them about volunteering my time becomes a 'teachable moment' concerning the value of arts and thinking a bit more carefully about their expectations that artists should donate freely 'for exposure'. 

In early April I was invited to speak at the Chicago Wilderness Congress about organizations fostering partnerships with artists in order to develop new audiences for their outreach. We provided many resources for environmental organizations to connect with artists, and vice versa. 

One of our strong directives was 'do NOT ask artists to work for free'. It was an eye-opener for many folks. : /

Kathy G


On May 1, 2014, at 11:28 PM, Jenny Keller wrote:

Here's an article that appeared in the NYT by Tim Kreider, a writer who has experienced just this sort of thing. It's gratifying to have someone nail this depressingly-common situation so very eloquently… 


Jenny


On Thu, May 1, 2014 at 8:08 PM, Bruce Bartrug <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
I have a friend who is a very good writer, who got lured into doing a sequence of twelve short spots in a fashion magazine called Flaunt, if can flaunt that.  He has six of the pieces fleshed out and went to the publisher to talk moeknee.  Turns out they wanted him to do it for about $40.  I kid you not.  He was thinking $1000 minimum.  His take on their response was, "They say, because we run on interns and exploitation, like the rest of the fashion industry, so this is how you break into the field. "The glory of being here is the pay off" (they actually said that, in so many words)."

Sound familiar?  I suggested he write an expose of the fashion industry and find a real world publication to print it.  That is, if there IS a publication anymore that doesn't operate in the same exploitative manor.

What do you think?  This crapola is all too common today and I just wonder if there's a way to warn others about it.  And warn what falling victim to this type of operation does to those who make their living doing art of any sort, including writing. 

b

--
Bruce Bartrug
Nobleboro, Maine, USA
[log in to unmask]
www.brucebartrug.com

The world is a dangerous place, not because of those who do evil, but because of those who look on and do nothing.  - Albert Einstein

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--
Jenny Keller
Program Specialist, Science Illustration Program
CSU Monterey Bay • 100 Campus Center • Seaside, CA 93955-8001
(831) 582-3480 • (831) 582-4502 fax • scienceillustration.org

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