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That's an excellent point, Lore..... I'd go through a squish in no time. Others would be far more hesitant. 

I learned from the beginning that it was "only paper" and "only paint". We were required to buy sable brushes including 1.5" and 3/4", handmade paper, or don't show up for class without them. Years later, they have always been my go-to brushes and are really hard to replace. I've whined and sniveled on this listserv before about finding brushes that perform the same for under $200 bucks. Heck, I've spent $200 on a series of lesser brushes just to see if they work or not. 

But materials seem more expensive even in relation to the cost of living. And if one's interest is in the in-depth study of a technique, one is more likely to buy into the supplies, rather than someone taking a weekend classs to see if they like the medium.
Thanks to everyone who shares their thoughts.

Best, 
Linda
_____________________
Linda M. Feltner Artist, LLC
P.O. Box 325
Hereford, AZ 85615
(520) 803-0538
www.lindafeltner.com







On Sep 18, 2014, at 5:04 AM, Lore Ruttan wrote:

> Slightly TAN here since you're working with adults. I did a summer camp for jr high kids this last summer. I had them bring in palettes and then I squeezed paint into them but I could not believe how fast some of them went through the paint!! Some came back wanting more before the end of the class. It took me awhile to realize that when they were making a dilution on their palette most of the paint was getting rinsed off into waste water. *Facepalm........  hopefully I'm getting better at being more explicit.
> 
> On Tue, Sep 16, 2014 at 10:16 AM, Linda Feltner <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> I would Love that, Jenny. I seem to live far from a lot of things! That can be both good and bad, eh? 
> 
> Well of course I agree..... I have to assure my students that if I want pristine color, I have other brand-new palettes or use Corelle white bowls. Some botanical artists have saucer-like eyes when they see my "working" palette. I know how precise they must be.......
> I tend to mix very large puddles, and Corelle bowls will hold a lot for a 1.5" flat brush, whereas a porcelain plate just won't hold the liquid. I suppose that's why in a travel kit, I look for larger mixing palettes. The tiny little boxes are neat, but I need more mixing room. 
> 
> ta
> Linda
> 
> _____________________
> Linda M. Feltner Artist, LLC
> P.O. Box 325
> Hereford, AZ 85615
> (520) 803-0538
> www.lindafeltner.com
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> On Sep 15, 2014, at 12:39 PM, Jenny Keller wrote:
> 
>> love those stories, linda!
>> 
>> yeah, i leave the corners of the palette-wells full of the old paint -- why scrub all that out with a precious brush when one can simply squish a new fresh blob of paint on top and work with that?
>> 
>> ...sigh, wish we all didn't live so far apart, and could go out painting together, at our leisure. :o)
>> 
>> jenny
>> 
>> ________________________________________________
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> 
> -- 
> Lore Ruttan, Ph.D.
> 
> Lore Ruttan Illustration
> 
> Visit my Etsy shop at http://www.etsy.com/shop/Paperlore
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