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And archery?

-Ingeborg
On Nov 3, 2014 5:33 PM, "Bruce Lapham" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> So...uhm...I guess this would be mine to answer.  Sadly, it's all kind of
> confusing and sometimes vague.
>
> An event, as defined by corporate, is any official/sponsored get together
> that is announced in the standard way.  What is the standard way, you ask?
> That depends.  For local meetings/practices/farbles, it can mean via email,
> webpage, FB, word of mouth, meeting announcement, semifore, smoke signals,
> kumi-daiko messaging.  Whatever!  For Kingdom events (those things we drive
> to on weekends and occassionaly for a whole week) must be announced in the
> Kingdom newsletter.  The difference is that Kingdom Court business can
> happen at a Kingdom event, but not any old ordinary event.  Royal events
> are the special Kingdom events described in Calontir law.
>
> Demos are a wierd beastie.  Since the local group announced it, it gets
> covered by insurance.  Because it is wide open to the general public, it
> has a couple of special rules.  They mostly come from the legal (read
> seneschal) side of things.  Rather than listing the individual scenarios
> that have been made illegal over the years, the general rule is that the
> public cannot participate in combat related activities.
>
> As it was related to me by the previous SocSen, someone threw a fit about
> allowing "mundanes" to fight in armour at renfest like demos, so that was
> made illegal.  Someone found a loophole and started "whack-a-knight."
>  Someone else threw a fit about that not being within the spirit of the
> rule, so that was made illegal.  Someone decided that they would just have
> people sign a waiver, declare it a fighter practice, and then work with the
> public.  Again, someone threw a fit and that was made illegal.
>
> The general idea is that if someone walks up to the SCA at a demo and puts
> on armour, they might not really grasp the concept of what they are getting
> into.  Someone who comes to a practice or an event has at least a basic
> idea that people are actually hitting each other and it isn't all just
> stage craft and fakery.
>
> The insurance thing comes up a lot because it is an easy scapegoat that
> will assuage peoples objections.  The SCA insurance does not cover injury.
> If anybody gets injured during an SCA activity, they must rely on their own
> insurance.  The SCA insurance is mostly for property damage caused by the
> activities of the event, although we all know that it has other uses for
> protecting the corporation.
>
> What if they sue, you ask?  Well, (speaking as a teacher and not a lawyer
> here) I'm pretty sure that the courts have set clear guidelines on that
> one.  The courts have regularly held that certain sporting activities have
> inherent dangers and that participating in the activity restricts (or
> completely negates) your ability to sue over injury.  We use the waivers as
> proof that the parties involved knew that it was possibly dangerous.
>
> So, here's the short version.
> A demo is covered by insurance, but the rules say we can't put people in
> armour or let them try it out until they come to a practice or event.
>
>
> Whew...
>
> Murdoch, the guy who is almost done and won't have to answer these type of
> questions any more.
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
> Date: Mon, 3 Nov 2014 15:48:02 -0600
> From: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: [CALONTIR] When can new people play?
> To: [log in to unmask]
>
> Well, we don’t let people ride horses without proper forms and procedures,
> regardless of whether it’s a “regular” event or a demo (or anything else),
> but I don’t think this is in line with your question (I just wanted a
> clarification concerning horses – we don’t do pony rides). I’ll let someone
> else respond to the question of what makes an event “official”.   ;]
>
>
>
>
>
> Eringlin
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* Clayton Neff [mailto:[log in to unmask]]
> *Sent:* Monday, November 03, 2014 3:14 PM
> *To:* [log in to unmask]
> *Subject:* [CALONTIR] When can new people play?
>
>
>
> I am confused about when an event is not really an event.
>
> It is my understanding that all SCA gatherings that expect to be covered
> by the SCA insurance are considered "events" and require signed waivers for
> all participants. This includes wars, tournaments, practices, A&S events,
> everything.
>
> Is that correct?
>
> If so, what about demos? Again, it is my understanding that these are
> "events" and all participants must have a signed waiver. But I have heard
> from several different sources that we absolutely CAN NOT let any people at
> demos sign a waiver and try our activities out, because INSURANCE.
>
> Is that correct?
>
> If so, then how do we get away with letting people try stuff at other
> events? Is there some magic wand we have to waive that I am unaware of? Is
> there something we aren't doing at demos that we are doing at all other
> events that makes letting someone shoot archery or ride a horse be covered
> by the insurance?
>
> Or are we perpetuating a well meaning myth? Or are demos not events, so
> they aren't covered by the insurance? Can someone with better knowledge of
> / access to the rules attempt to explain this to my poor brain?
>
> Please note that I am NOT pointing any fingers at people for not allowing
> new folks to participate. I firmly believe that everyone is trying to
> follow the rules at laid down by corporate to the best of their abilities.
> I am just confused as to what those rules are and why the are interpreted
> they way they are.
>
> Thanks.
>
> -- Logan --
>
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