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Pencil and pen an ink drawings may be very susceptible to a pix-elated appearance. It might depend 
more heavily on the type/quality of projection screen in the projector. I suspect the ability to 
show the light and dark greys is not up to snuff, so they go more black and white, thus making the 
image look more pix-elated on high contrast images where there are only 1024 x 768 pixels to 
represent the image.

I don't think the image format, other than a very compressed JPG, would matter.

Britt

On 12/29/14 1:50 PM, Linda Feltner wrote:
> Interesting. I do use a PPT program at the museum. Sometimes I set it to run on two screens. Mostly
> not.
> At home I have not tried to project the PPT program. I use it mainly to project a working drawing or
> final sketch onto the good paper. Those files are either .psd, .tiff or .jpeg.  I don't think I've
> tried a .pdf file.hmmm..
>
> I have used the same VGA adaptor for several years, in workshops at the conference, various
> workshops, and at the museum. It seems to perform fine. But I will inspect the pins, regardless.
>
> One thing I have noticed with pencil drawings projected. This also happened in the classroom at the
> last conference. The photos look fine. But any working drawing pencil sketch which could have been a
> JPEG or PDF of 150-300dpi, projected in a pitiful manner. Very pixelated. I asked the technician at
> the time could we get any better resolution out of it, and he looked at the Display preferences to
> see if we were using the highest res possible. Apparently we were.
>
> So it remains curious. I have a series of workshops coming up and may have to do a test experiment
> using the same images, making notes of the resolution settings of the computer and any other influence.
>
> Cheers, I'll look at what you mentioned.
> L.

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