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Hi Gail,
I use it for distribution and audience building. For example, I want people
to see the art on my blog/website, but unless in promoting it, it's just a
static page. About every third time I post on Twitter, it'll get
'retweeted' and new people get to see my art. Of those, I get a few new
followers per retweet. The net affect, over time is that I'm building a
community of people who like my work. Most of those are not people in my
geographic region, or people who would have otherwise seen my
illustrations. It's kinda fascinating as a mechanism.

As Glendon and Mieke have pointed out, it's also a knowledge base. For
example, one of my new twitter followers is a CDC researcher, and now I'm
developing a series of content with her. It looks like it'll be a great
story.

~Em

On Apr 14, 2015 7:28 AM, "Gail Guth" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

>  Hi, Emily,
>
> How are you using Twitter? I have joined but haven't had time to explore
> it and frankly just don't know what to do with it.
>
> Is anyone else using Twitter to advantage?
>
> Gail
>
>
>
>
> On 4/14/15 9:36 AM, Emily S. Damstra wrote:
>
>  Hi Laura,
>  Below is my answer to your question "How did you find work, when you
> started your career?"
>
>  My first several projects (at least!) were for people I knew or for
> people who were referred to me by someone I knew.
>
>  These days my website does bring me some work, but I think the majority
> of projects I work on can be traced back to someone I know. I have acquired
> some excellent clients thanks to volunteering at a local nature reserve and
> to being active in SONSI (sonsi.ca).
>
> My advice to anyone who is looking for illustration work:
>
>  1) Be active in your community – though not for the express purpose of
> getting work. Volunteer, join clubs, be social, engage. Not only is it good
> for the soul, but someday one of those relationships will probably lead to
> work - and it might be in the most unexpected way.
>
>  2) While working on a project, don't fear asking for help from
> scientists or other content experts. The worst that can happen is that they
> won't reply; the best that can happen is that someone enthusiastic about
> the subject your illustrating is really helpful and now knows you exist and
> might hire you in the future. If they do help you, be sure to thank them
> with a card or print featuring your work.
>
>  3) Have a website and put as much good quality work up there as you can.
> Sometimes people will end up at your website after searching for an
> illustration of something specific. Do keep in mind that potential clients
> who find you via your website are likely to hire you to do the same type of
> work that they see in your portfolio.
>
>  4) Others might say to be active on social media. Personally I have not
> maximized the potential of social media, but I can say that (for me)
> Twitter is definitely showing potential (I just joined last month).
>     ---
> *Emily S. Damstra*
> natural science illustration
> Guelph, Ontario
> (519) 616-3654 <%28519%29%20616-3654>
> *[log in to unmask] <[log in to unmask]>*
> www.emilydamstra.com
> emilydamstra.wordpress.com
>  Twitter: @EmilyDamstra
>
>  ________________________________________________
>
> Need to leave or subscribe to the Sciart-L listserv? Follow the
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>
>
> --
> Gail Guth
> Guth Illustration & Design
> 139 Lathrop Avenue
> Battle Creek, MI  49014-5076
> 269-963-1311
> [log in to unmask]
> www.guthillustration.com
>
>
>   ________________________________________________
>
> Need to leave or subscribe to the Sciart-L listserv? Follow the
> instructions at
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>

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