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Gretchen, it was that beret and smock you were wearing that got you into 
trouble!  ;-)

I'm going to be giving a lunch-time talk at the Kalamazoo Institute of 
Arts this fall, same idea... what is scientific illustration? It should 
be fun.

Gail




On 8/19/15 2:37 PM, OC Carlisle wrote:
> Gretchen, Love the short story, what a hoot!
>
> When I tell people what I do, they are fascinated with my description. 
> Just recently, at a “Pop Up” Art Show” reception in Commerce, 
> GA, Don Byram Art; I talked to the Jackson County Artists Guild 
> President, explaining my Monarch Metamorphosis, the Monarch Nectaring 
> On A Coneflower and the Old Field Pollinators. She was so fascinated 
> that after the first introductions, she asked me to talk about my art 
> to a sizable crowd, an extemporaneous gallery talk. There were several 
> secondary school teachers attending, who have asked me to give a 
> presentation to their classes. One of the teachers wants me to 
> demonstrate some techniques. What a joy!
>
> OC Carlisle
> Scientific Illustraton, Photographic Fine Art
> [log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]>
> carlisleillustration.squarespace.com 
> <http://carlisleillustration.squarespace.com>
>
>
>> On Aug 19, 2015, at 2:05 PM, Gretchen Halpert 
>> <[log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]>> wrote:
>>
>> Agree with Taina. I have no problem referring to myself as an 
>> illustrator. Many are intrigued by " scientific illustrator" and hold 
>> our field even above art they don't understand.  To those who don't 
>> distinguish and ask, yes, I am an artist. I make things. I teach 2 
>> and 3-D design, color theory, perspective, etc at school. All the 
>> same skills regardless of your final output. Of course, my middle 
>> school kids do a whole section on scientific illustration too.
>>
>> Now, what about Children's Book Illustrators? I think they get the 
>> same beef/seitan we do, even though the range of their art and 
>> creativity is vast.
>>
>> One short story:
>> I was offered a technical illustration job. Lots of measuring, 
>> precise pen and ink work. They needed me to work regular hours 
>> on-site. Employer, "Now, I know you're an artist, and work when 
>> you're in the mood, but is it possible you could come in during 
>> business hours on a regular schedule?"
>>
>> She assumed I was the stereotypical undependable, paint- flinging, 
>> movie artist prone to hysteria.
>>
>> Hurray for every one who enjoys what they do, regardless of labels.
>>
>> Cheers,
>> Gretchen
>>
>> www.gretchenhalpert-distance program.com <http://program.com>
>> Sent from my studio.
>>
>>
>>> On Aug 19, 2015, at 11:56 AM, Mieke Roth <[log in to unmask] 
>>> <mailto:[log in to unmask]>> wrote:
>>>
>>> great thought, Taina.
>>>
>>> Mieke Roth
>>> Science illustrator
>>> http://miekeroth.com
>>> +31 (0) 6 37 28 08 99
>>>
>>>> Op 19 aug. 2015 om 17:31 heeft Taina Litwak 
>>>> <[log in to unmask]> het volgende geschreven:
>>>>
>>>> “Art”.   The modern understanding of the term, I believe, 
>>>> includes the concept that the maker emotionally and intellectually 
>>>> is working on expressing him/herself in some manner on the worthy 
>>>> topic of the human condition and culture.   Plays, novels, fine art 
>>>> painting, landscapes, still life, abstractions, conceptual stuff, 
>>>> sculpture, film, any image making…. One topic, 7 billion 
>>>> interpretations.
>>>>
>>>> This is where illustration – the goal of which is inherently to 
>>>> tell a story or explain a specific something - falls a bit outside. 
>>>> Editorial illustration, which is often conceptual and if its any 
>>>> good IS evocative, frequently address aspects of the human 
>>>> condition (or situations) and gets so some slack. So it is 
>>>> sometimes reluctantly included as “art”.
>>>>
>>>> Technical illustration – scientific and natural history included 
>>>> - does not deal with  this and so we are not invited under the 
>>>> umbrella of “art”.  Some good scientific illustration is 
>>>> emotionally evocative of course, but much is not.   It is not the 
>>>> goal of the work.  We make images that society has come to value as 
>>>> the way our culture sees Science changes.  What we do with our 
>>>> images CAN put our output on a more meta level, and the resulting 
>>>> self-aware product can jump into the traditional sphere of “Art". 
>>>>   But usually our clients have no interest in doing that.  They 
>>>> just need us to explain the facts, in the vehicle of their choice. 
>>>>  This is what I have made a living doing for the past 35 years. 
>>>>  Image making - I love it. It has value, but it's not “art”.
>>>>
>>>> Taina
>>>>
>>>> Litwak Illustration Studio
>>>> 13029 Chestnut Oak Drive
>>>> Darnestown, MD 20878
>>>>
>>>> tel: 301-527-0569
>>>> mobile: 240-750-9245
>>>>
>>>> http://agresearchmag.ars.usda.gov/2014/sep/insect/
>>>>
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-- 
Gail Guth
Guth Illustration & Design
139 Lathrop Avenue
Battle Creek, MI  49014-5076
269-963-1311
[log in to unmask]
www.guthillustration.com <http://www.guthillustration.com/>



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