Thanks (I think) Geoff - I am somewhat overwhelmed with this and multiple other things right now and have not even opened the box. All of the points that everyone has mentioned previously are precisely why I am actually not yet committed to keeping it. I went ahead because the rebates were great and ended 12/31 (there are still some, but not as extensive). I am still debating whether I can afford the time to do all the work (and endure potential aggravation) of printing myself. 

I am currently in a rather rural area of Florida. I have researched local printers and decided that considering the traveling and time lost there I’d be better off spending my time doing my own printing. But as said, I have not fully committed to that decision! I don’t have this problem while in New England (Massachusetts). Great, amazing resources there, even locally on Cape Cod (in fact I just ordered some prints from my shop there since I have yet to find the right substrate for self-sticking murals that I might use with this printer). But, if I continued with a distant printer, there are the logistics of multiple shipping destinations etc.

If I ever get the thing out of the box and actually functional, I’ll let you know how it’s going!
Barb


Barbara Harmon
508•430•8308





On Jan 8, 2016, at 2:18 AM, Geoff Thompson <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

I'm jealous! :)


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Sent:
Thu, 7 Jan 2016 20:31:18 -0500
Subject:
Re: [SCIART] Suggestions for an archival quality printer


I confess …UPS delivered the SureColor P800 yesterday….. 


On Jan 7, 2016, at 6:51 PM, Geoff Thompson <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

I only have a basic Canon printer but last year I saw photographer friends raving about the new Epsom Surecolor-P800.
I see online there is an A2 version and a 17" version. 

Note Les is using Canson Platine Fibre Rag, which I believe he helped Canson develop for fine art printing.
In a talk last year Les explained that most commercial printer profiles are pretty useless, because modern USB spectrometers don't have enough power to use polarizing filters and thus read through the glare on darker color values.

Color calibration of screens and printers is tricky and you need a professional screen like an EIZO to see 99% of Adobe RGB color space. No screen can see more than Adobe RGB but if the image is in ProPhoto or another large color space, good printers can print colors you can't see on a screen. Most screens only see sRGB which is the color space of the cheapest possible CRT monitor from the 1980s. It also happens to be the default color space for Adobe Creative Suite, Photoshop etc.!  Most scanners seem to only scan in sRGB too. 

Les's notes on his web page are useful for all this sort of stuff.
http://www.leswalkling.com/words/the-theory-of-practice/

Sounds like it's worth waiting and saving if there is a new model of the 4900 coming.

Cheers,
Geoff



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Thu, 7 Jan 2016 09:22:55 -0500
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Re: [SCIART] Suggestions for an archival quality printer


Interesting points. I may eventually try a professional printer to make a series of limited edition signed prints but for now home printing on art papers produces a nice enough job. I don't have large prints and this way I don't need to keep inventory. Someone wants a print, I print it. And I charge what I think is a reasonable amount, well more than $10 for an 8x10!

Thanks, Lore



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