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Wonderful article. Thank you for sharing.

Sharon Morgera
Newport, RI

On Thu, Jan 21, 2016 at 12:00 AM, Aileen Conley <[log in to unmask]>
wrote:

> The Royal Collection, Windsor Castle, owns 95 original watercolors by
> Maria Sibylla Merian, which sometimes go on pubic display. The paintings
> on vellum were purchased in 1755 by George III, as Prince of Wales.
>
>
>
> Several were included in a 2008 exhibit at the Queens Gallery, Buckingham
> Palace, in 2008: "Amazing Rare Things: The Art of Natural History in the
> Age of Discovery." The exhibition also included work by da Vinci,
> Wenceslaus Holler and others. The exhibition catalog:
> https://www.royalcollection.org.uk/microsites/amazingrarethings/ .
>
>
>
> Rare book collections sometimes hold high-quality reproductions (facsimile
> reproductions?) of the complete "Insects of Surinam' folio and other work. (Perhaps
> the Bancroft Libraries, for those locally in the SFBA.)
>
>
>  Thank you, Kathryn, for the link to the Atlantic article.
>
>
> A. Conley
>
> ------------------------------
> Date: Wed, 20 Jan 2016 21:55:33 -0600
> From: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: [SCIART] Article of interest on Maria Sibylia Merian
> To: [log in to unmask]
>
>
> I saw a MSM print or two here in Chicago at Joel Oppenheimer Gallery on
> Michigan Avenue. It was lovely to see it close up with all the subtlety of
> color and line. Didn't make a mental note of who the engraver was, but I
> bet you could call the gallery and they could give you some information on
> their holdings of her work.
>
> Kathy G
>
> On Jan 20, 2016, at 8:30 PM, Karen Ackoff wrote:
>
> I saw her work at the Special Collections Library at Washington University
> in St. Louis — I think. It would have been over 20 years ago, and they may
> have been prints. It was part of a bequest someone had given to the library
> while they were still living. I don’t recall the gentleman’s name, but I
> spent the afternoon with him and he was treasure.
>
> That aside, a quick google search brought up the Getty, so you might start
> there. They staged an exhibition on her work and life. The curator of the
> exhibition would surely know where her original works are.
>
> Searching further, I see that Peter the Great bought all her original
> works and they reportedly remain in Russia. This is off a web page… so I’d
> research it further just to make sure. And I guess that means I must have
> seen prints 20 some odd years ago. Wikipedia says Peter the Great bought “a
> significant number” of her works which are kept in academic collections in
> St. Petersburg. There are references listed on the Wiki page.
>
> Prints have appeared on Christies for as much as $238,000.
>
> Pages mention that her engraver was Joseph Mulder, but close attention
> should be paid to the engraver, as the engraver often was an artist in his
> own right. Think of Tenniel’s Alice In Wonderland drawings - very pale
> pencil drawings that the engraver transformed into the drawings we are
> familiar with. Marian’s paintings were done on vellum with watercolor
> and/or gouache (apparently women were not allowed to paint in oils due to
> some artist’s guild rule).
>
> This page has a lot of good info:
> http://arttattler.com/archivemariamerian.html
>
> That ought to get you started.
>
>
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