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Happy New Year to you Marla!

If you want archival, you should focus your research on archival pigments. This also includes matching paper. 
Pigmented inks are more archival. Dye inks are not, as far as I have been instructed. 
So if you want archival, that may be a primary factor. 

I'm sure others who have their own equipment will have advice.

I use a museum-quality, control-freak (her own words) specialist to do my archival printing, and she is extremely serious about archival quality, along with the printer, ink and paper that all have to be matched for archival quality.

Best cheer,
Linda
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Linda M. Feltner Artist, LLC
P.O. Box 325
Hereford, AZ 85615
(520) 803-0538







On Jan 6, 2016, at 8:38 AM, Marla Coppolino wrote:

Dear Friends,

I'm considering purchase of an archival quality printer for producing prints of my art and photography work.

One recent online source (not affiliated with any printer company) recommends either:
- Epson SureColor P600 (uses pigment inks; higher end, in the $700 range), or
- Canon Pixma Pro-100 (uses dye inks; lower-mid range, the $300 range).

I am aware that the bigger, longer-term expense is the ink cartridges, plus the obligatory hassle of keeping the machine in regular use to avoid clogging.

I invite opinions on your experiences. Thank you!

Happy and creative wishes to all for 2016!
Marla

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