John, when I was working on my paper on Sraffa and Adolph Lowe for the Kregel festschrift, Geoff Harcourt advised me about the work of Stephanie Blankenburg.  I guess part of her dissertation was a sort of updating of the kind of work the Ozzie David Clark did back in the late 70s, early 80s? That is, a survey of heterodox growth theory of sorts.  As you probably know, Lowe was a growth theorist, so even though I did not concentrate on that aspect of his work, I am familiar with it and others who were also doing similar or complementary work.  Including Ed Nell, by the way, whose transformational growth approach has included empirical work, sometimes by Ed's students or former students. Ed's co-edited (with Joseph Halevi and David Laibman) book, BEYOND THE STEADY STATE, has some interesting work, might be worth a perusal. Of course, that was before the mainstream invented endogenous growth (NOT!). 

Someone else's work your friend might want to look into is Mark Setterfield.  And he has some edited or co-edited volumes where there may be other relevant contributions. I wonder if Engelbert Stockhammer has done anything in this regard? Worth a search on google scholar? Marc Lavoie would be a good person to put the original question to, don't know if he is on this list?

Heterodox Indian economists seem to have frequently made contributions to growth theory, Sukhamoy Chakravarty, someone mentioned Amit Bhaduri (by the way, Ed Nell once wrote a review of one of Steve Marglin's books entitled, "Jean Baptiste Marglin" :) ).  

Pasinetti has had several students who have made important contributions (Roberto Scazzieri, Mauro Baranzini) many of them have single-authored books and edited collections. Others doing work along similar lines, Michael Landesmann, Harald Hagemann, I wonder if Heinrich Bortis might be another person to ask the original question?  The journal Structural Change and Economic Dynamics focuses on a lot of this kind of research. 

Ciao, good luck!



Mathew Forstater
Professor of Economics, UMKC
 & Research Director, 
Binzagr Institute  page2image544
for Sustainable Prosperity

From: AFEEMAIL List <[log in to unmask]> on behalf of Mat Forstater <[log in to unmask]>
Reply-To: AFEEMAIL List <[log in to unmask]>
Date: Saturday, February 27, 2016 7:42 AM
To: AFEEMAIL List <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: [AFEEMAIL] Growth Theory

John, there are many, but I am in a rush, just wanted to remind you of the Cornwalls! I know you are an honorary Canadian, so there's n question you are familiar! :)

Mathew Forstater
Professor of Economics, UMKC
 & Research Director, 
Binzagr Institute  page2image544
for Sustainable Prosperity

From: AFEEMAIL List <[log in to unmask]> on behalf of "Henry, John" <[log in to unmask]>
Reply-To: AFEEMAIL List <[log in to unmask]>
Date: Friday, February 26, 2016 5:41 PM
To: AFEEMAIL List <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: [AFEEMAIL] Growth Theory

Phil,

 

Thanks for these. Yes, the problem remains that of equilibrium, full employment assumptions. But, maybe something can be tweaked. My colleague is a pretty smart guy and know the Wynn Godley approach quite well (though it doesn't quite speak to what he's after.)

 

John

 

John F. Henry
Levy Economics Institute of Bard College
Annandale-on-Hudson
NY 12504
 

From: AFEEMAIL Discussion List [[log in to unmask]] on behalf of Philip Pilkington [[log in to unmask]]
Sent: Friday, February 26, 2016 5:08 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: Growth Theory

Oh and the Thirlwall work is a long run theory of growth.

But again... Non-ergodicity... Do we trust this? 

On Friday, 26 February 2016, Philip Pilkington <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
The Cambridge growth theory should be able to generate it... in theory. But I've never seen it done. I think that stuff was dropped after Robinson's "History vs Equilibrium" work when methodology overruled long-term modelling.

But it wouldn't be hard to plug in some distribution figures from Piketty/Saez into a Cambridge equation. But would we good non-ergodic folks accept the result? Especially with that full employment assumption built in...

Beyond that there's Baduri-Marglin but that's just export led stuff.

On Friday, 26 February 2016, Henry, John <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

Colleagues,

 

I had a question from a Levy associate that I could not readily answer. Perhaps some of you can come to my assistance. Does anyone know of any heterodox types who work on non-neoclassical theories of growth from which long-term predictions can be generated? Most of the literature I know of in this area is either old or deals with sustainability. But, the issue addressed is to develop a reasonable counter to conventional theory(ies) that appears both more reasonable and also usable in forecasting.

 

Any takers? Many thanks in advance.

 

John

 

John F. Henry
Levy Economics Institute of Bard College
Annandale-on-Hudson
NY 12504
 


--
Philip Pilkington

Tel: 0044(0)7825371244



--
Philip Pilkington

Tel: 0044(0)7825371244