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Please check out my article in SUSTAIN magazine at this URL:
http://louisville.edu/kiesd/sustain-magazine/SUSTAIN-33.pdf

Cheers, Charlie

On Tue, Apr 5, 2016 at 10:33 AM, Frank T. Krell <[log in to unmask]>
wrote:

> At least in entomology, botany, conchology, likely many other disciplines,
> “citizen science” is an old (and very important) hat. In many countries,
> amateurs contributing to faunistics, floristics, taxonomy, and museum
> collections is the majority, if not the vast majority. This has been so
> since the 1800s at the latest. I guess the (rather sparse) literature on
> amateur science is not considered in the statistics below.
>
> The current “citizen science” is probably different in that the
> traditional “amateur” is self-motivated and self-educated whereas the
> modern “citizen scientist” is motivated (and “trained”) by a program led by
> a professional (= paid) scientist or a professional scientist mentor. Also
> citizen science is often scaled up to larger projects, but the work is
> often scaled down to technical help, but is there a hard distinction
> between citizen sciences and amateur science as it happened ubiquitously
> almost since the beginning of (taxonomic) times?
>
>
>
> Frank
>
>
>
>
>
> Dr Frank T. Krell
>
> Curator of Entomology
>
> Commissioner, International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature
>
> Chair, ICZN ZooBank Committee
> Department of Zoology
> Denver Museum of Nature & Science
> 2001 Colorado Boulevard
> Denver, CO 80205-5798 USA
> [log in to unmask]
> Phone: (+1) (303) 370-8244
> Fax: (+1) (303) 331-6492
>
> http://www.dmns.org/science/museum-scientists/frank-krell
>
> lab page: http://www.dmns.org/krell-lab
>
>
>
> *The Denver Museum of Nature & Science salutes the citizens of metro
> Denver for helping fund arts, culture and science through their support of
> the **Scientific and Cultural Facilities District (SCFD)
> <http://www.scfd.org/>**. *
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* Entomological Collections Network Listserve [mailto:
> [log in to unmask]] *On Behalf Of *Mike Quinn
> *Sent:* Tuesday, April 05, 2016 8:07 AM
> *To:* [log in to unmask]
> *Subject:* interesting blog/paper on the *rapid* rise of citizen science
> related publications...
>
>
>
>
> *Examining new trends in citizen science *
> February 2, 2016 by Jennifer Grigg, Plos Blogs
>
> [image: Examining new trends in citizen science]
>
> Figure showing the growth of published peer reviewed articles on citizen
> science, from 1997 to 2014. Figure from Follet and Strezov, PLOS ONE.
>
> <snip>
>
>
>
> In total, 1127 unique articles were reviewed, from these 239 were excluded
> for not being directly related to citizen science (as above).
>
> Follet and Strezov reported that the first citizen science article was
> published in 1997. In the years following, few articles were published
> until 2007 during which 6 papers were presented at the Ecological Society
> of America Meeting. After this, the number of peer-reviewed citizen science
> articles increased substantially.
>
> The most widely published topic where citizen science contributed to the
> project was biology, with 72% of articles falling into this category.
> Biology-related citizen science articles also experienced a rapid growth in
> the number of publications, at a faster rate than all other scientific
> fields. The most common objectives among the biology-related articles was
> to assess the diversity and distribution of species, in particular birds.
>
> The findings of Follet and Strezov's study is supported by the results of
> a recent meta-analysis published in *PLOS ONE*, which identified biology,
> conservation and ecology as the primary fields utilising citizen science.
> The study also reported the highest scientific output is generated in the
> fields of ornithology, astronomy, meteorology and microbiology.
>
> A caveat of publishing research generated in part from citizen scientists
> is that many of these volunteers received no formal training, bringing the
> quality and reliability of the data into question. However, these issues
> can be addressed. Researchers can design standardised monitoring protocols
> to identify unreliable data, or prevent the collection of poor quality
> data, by using tools such as data entry forms with automated error checking
> capabilities. In their study Follet and Strezov found that an increasing
> number of publications were centred on addressing the methodologies and
> validation techniques researchers can use to detect errors in data and
> reduce the occurrence of these errors and eliminate bias.
>
> Overall, the study reported the number of citizen science publications are
> increasing. But, according to another recent study
> <http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006320714004029> reviewing
> the contributions of citizen science projects, only 12% of bio-diversity
> related citizen science projects contributed data that resulted in
> peer-reviewed scientific articles. So as it seems, there is still room to
> increase the acceptance of citizen science.
>
> *What does the future hold for citizen science?*
>
> Citizen science is becoming ever more popular and is rapidly enabling
> non-experts to contribute to the growing field of scientific knowledge. One
> of the major benefits of citizen science is that it allows researchers to
> utilise resources to analyse large volumes of data quickly, often with
> lower financial cost. Furthermore, data can be collected from a wider
> demographic of participants over a much larger spatial scale that
> researchers would not necessarily have the time or resources to monitor
> otherwise.
>
> The growing role of citizen scientists in research is now being recognised
> around the globe. In 2015 professional citizen science organisations were
> created in Europe, Australia and the United States, and the first Citizen
> Science Association Conference was held, with another one is planned for
> February 2017. In the US the Crowdsourcing and Citizen Science Act of 2015
> was introduced to encourage the use of citizen science within the federal
> government. As technology develops and more people have access to the
> resources available over the internet, this increases opportunities to
> engage wider audiences in a diverse range of projects. Based on current
> trends, this should mean that more of the journal articles published in
> 2016 will celebrate the contribution of the citizen scientists around the
> world.
>
> full text: http://phys.org/news/2016-02-trends-citizen-science.html#jCp
>
>
>
> ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>
>
> Ria Follett. Vladimir Strezovl. 2015. An Analysis of Citizen Science
> Based Research: Usage and Publication Patterns, *PLOS ONE*. DOI:
> 10.1371/journal.pone.0143687
> <http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0143687>
>
>
>
> =====================================
>
>
>
> Mike Quinn, Austin
> ________________
> Texas Entomology
> http://texasento.net
>