Hi Emily,

I'd be interested in hearing about the results of the scan at Colorgenics since it's near me too. 

Best,
Kathryn

Sent from my iPhone

On Jun 10, 2016, at 8:51 AM, Emily S. Damstra <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

Thanks to everyone who responded to my question.
I had actually found a place that would photograph my artwork with a system that uses a camera, however I was not convinced that the outcome would be as good as a scan, especially since much of the painting is white background and there are some yellows next to it.
I had also found this place in Toronto, which is probably what I'll end up using, that has an Uberscan system: http://colourgenics.com/?category/Products-Services
In both cases, if I add up the cost of gas, parking in Toronto, and the fee for the professional image capture, I might as well just buy another scanner and do it myself in pieces -- hence my query to the List. The time involved would probably be about the same as having it done professionally (because of travel and wait time) -- AND I'd have a scanner to keep in case I ever need to do it again. However, an affordable scanner without the raised rim may be wishful thinking, so I'll be headed to Toronto.
(Mike, your patience must exceed mine, as I'm not even willing to try it on my scanner with the raised edge! Britt, I'm not confident that I'd be able to get a good result using my own camera; I really need an image that's as good as a scan.)
Thanks again,

---
Emily S. Damstra
natural science illustration
Guelph, Ontario
(519) 616-3654
[log in to unmask]
www.emilydamstra.com
Twitter: @EmilyDamstra

On Thu, Jun 9, 2016 at 6:34 PM, Bruce Bartrug <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
Geoff has a good point, Emily, in that some pro cameras have rather amazing resolution.  While these cameras are expensive and may be mostly confined to fashion and architectural photography, it would be worth checking local photographers to find one that has a camera with a 50+ megapixel sensor, AND some experience in photographing artwork.  Work such as yours should be photographed with lights that are polarized and with a lens that has a polarizer as well.  Polarizing at both ends removes any trace of reflections or highlighting. You'd only need to transfer the image (via CD or USB stick) and size it appropriately.


--
Bruce Bartrug
Nobleboro, Maine, USA
[log in to unmask]
www.brucebartrug.com

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