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Hi All:
I agree with O.C. and Natalya, in researching the GAG pricing guidelines, and simple research of same subjects.

Even if it's a small Winery, please create a contract (see GAG) or a minimum Scope of Work or Letter of Agreement, that outlines what the job entails, size, scans, type of illustration, a schedule with deadlines for the client's review, NUMBER of review/revisions allowed, a kill clause, and specify copyright ownership. I would keep ownership of copyright to yourself, I like Natalya's comments on maybe they would display the originals, or make a poster (as another project). 

When it's a small company or organization, I have sometimes provided a not-to-exceed price. Meaning I will charge them per hour up to that amount limit. Some clients get real scared when they hear an hourly rate. BUT, if the client is great at cooperating, providing text on time, and few revisions, then they save themselves money, we stay on schedule, and I'm still getting an hourly rate. I tell them that if we don't use all the hours, then I do not charge them for what they don't use. Some folks don't follow that philosophy, but I feel it helps a small client.

I have also traded wine labels for cases of high-quality wine -- helping a Cellar become established. And it was a very fair deal.

Best of luck to you and your project!
Linda
___________________________
Linda M. Feltner Artist, LLC
Guild of Natural Science Illustrators, President-Elect
(520) 803-0538
www.lindafeltner.com





On Jul 10, 2016, at 9:06 AM, Natalya Zahn wrote:

> OC gave an excellent rundown of basic considerations - I will strongly second the advice to collect as much market research as possible, and my go-to pricing guide with any project I feel out of my comfort zone with is the Graphic Artists Guild Handbook to Pricing & Ethics (OC linked to it I believe). You'll get a feel for the spectrum of pricing that a particular project in a particular industry can command, then you can place yourself within that range, using factors like OC listed (your preferred hourly rate x time you think it'll take + materials, what the market will bear, etc). 
> 
> As I'm working out the price I will ask for, I also determine a bare minimum that I won't go under - you don't want to start out with this low number, but establish one, should the client come back to you with a counter offer that is significantly lower than original asking price. Try to put yourself in a position where you're prepared for any answer they give, which will give you confidence in potential negotiation. A guide like the GAG handbook will also outline the details of licensing/rights usage, which can be tinkered with to adjust pricing to fit a budget.
> 
> *Also good info to have, if you don't already, is what size production run this label will go on. The more units a piece of illustration helps sell, the more valuable it is. ;)
> 
> I work with many commercial clients of this nature and I don't ever include the sale of the physical artwork in my estimate, unless the client specifically requests it (hardly anyone ever does). In illustration, the original art is typically a separate sale, though this can also be used as a bargaining chip in negotiation. If this winery has a tasting room, maybe they'd like to display the finished art...
> 
> Best of luck to you - I've always wanted to do a wine label myself! I hope you're able to come up with a fair agreement that satisfies all parties. :)
> 
> -Natalya
> 
> On Jul 10, 2016, at 8:02 AM, Mirka Hokkanen <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
>> I am writing for pricing help as I barely have any experience since most of the stuff I've done before has been for friends. 
>> 
>> I've been asked for a quote for three fairly simple images that would be used for a company's wine labels. Its through a high end design company catering to small independent companies, with offices in london and sydney, so I don't want to sound like a complete dork on my end. 
>> I replied that I would be happy to work with them and go ahead and send the information over so I can give them a quote. 
>> 
>> How do you come up with a price with something like that? Im assuming there is some sort of industry average for jobs like that? They have a deadline of 2 weeks to complete it.
>>  
>> Thank you for any advice. :)
>> Mirka 
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