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Lore,

I've used the method Karen has indicated successfully.  My episode was on
the old Lanaquarelle 300lb hot press. Use a curved scalpel-like Exacto
blade and be very patient with the scraping.  If you get long fuzzy fibers
that stick up and won't remove with a white eraser, you can try to slice
them with the same scalpel blade, being very careful of course not to slice
into the paper below.  Since methyl cellulose is still used as a sizing, it
can restore the sheen of the paper if you feel that is needed.  (You might
email Twin Rocker to see if that's what they size their paper with.)
Methyl cellulose is also used as wallpaper paste, but make certain it is
the only ingredient if you should buy some.

I think you'll find this works well,
bab



On Wed, Jul 6, 2016 at 1:38 AM, Karen Ackoff <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Curious what brand of India ink you used. Windsor & Newton and/or Pelikan,
> Koh-I-Nohr’s universal black, and opaque acrylic inks work well. Higgins is
> a mess - way too gummy, too much shellac. More given to smearing,
> particularly in high humidity. Waterproof, by the way, doesn’t happen
> instantly. It can take a few days for the ink to “cure”.
>
> I would duplicate the problem on a scrap of Twinrocker. Test your
> technique with it.
>
> Let it dry really, really well. Use a hair dryer beforehand, particularly
> if it’s humid. Scraping paper in a humid environment is asking for trouble.
>
> Try scraping it with a sharp blade, preferably a curved scalpel blade
> (being careful NOT to use the point of the blade). At first it will seem
> like you are getting nowhere, but be patient and just coax it along. Every
> now and then blow away any debris and use a white plastic eraser, which may
> pick up some additional material. The trick is to scrape gently, so as to
> damage the paper as little as possible.
>
> Repeat scraping/erasing until you get the desired result.
>
> If the area needs repair (and it may be just fine as is)…you can patch the
> area using one of several methods.
>
> I would mix white (permanent, zinc or titanium white gouache) with a
> little yellow ochre to match EXACTLY the color of the paper. Test it on a
> scrap, let it dry, and then look at the color match. Don’t worry that your
> mixture isn’t quite opaque. You don’t want thick, gummy paint. It should be
> fluid. Then, STIPPLE that over the area of any remaining ink. Let dry
> thoroughly. Repeat until it is covered to your satisfaction. If there is
> ink that keeps showing through, try using Dr. Martin’s bleed proof white
> for your white. I’ve sometimes used acrylic gesso to help repair spots -
> the gesso effectively seals what is beneath.
>
> A second approach would be to use a little methyl cellulose (a glue used
> to repair paper) over the area to build the paper back up. Then use the
> stipple method above.
>
> My guess is, though, that you can clean it up using a blade to gently,
> GENTLY scrape. I’ve done that many times. You will notice a slight change
> in the reflectivity of the paper's surface, but with cold press paper,
> you’ve got an uneven surface any way, so it should be relatively forgiving.
> 1/4-inch spot should be do-able.
>
> If this doesn’t work, Dave’s inlay method could work. I used an “inlay”
> method for the tiny numbers in crossword puzzles, when I did layout by
> hand, B.C. (before computers).
>
> Take pictures (it might be a fun newsletter contribution) and tell us how
> it goes. Best of luck.
>
> K
>
>
>
>
> On Jul 5, 2016, at 11:06 PM, Lore Ruttan <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
> Twin rocker 300lb cold press. Roughly 1/4" or 1/2 cm. Made worse by
> dabbing it of course!
>
> Interesting idea to patch the paper.
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Jul 5, 2016, at 9:50 PM, Karen Ackoff <[log in to unmask] <[log in to unmask]>>
> wrote:
>
> How big of a blob and what kind of paper?
> K
>
> From my iPhone.
>
> On Jul 5, 2016, at 8:46 PM, Lore Ruttan <[log in to unmask]
> <[log in to unmask]>> wrote:
>
> After carefully inking in some 1000 or so names on a piece of art for a
> capital campaign, my nib left a blob of ink on the very last thing, the
> title. Any thoughts on removing India Ink from watercolor paper? Mr. Clean
> doesn't work on India Ink. I'm thinking carefully scraping it off with a
> razor is the way to go but if anyone has a secret formula please let me
> know!
>
> --
> *Lore Ruttan, *Ph.D.
>
> Lore Ruttan Illustration <http://www.loreruttanillustration.com/>
>
> Visit my Etsy shop at http://www.etsy.com/shop/Paperlore
>
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-- 
Bruce Bartrug
Nobleboro, Maine, USA
[log in to unmask]
www.brucebartrug.com

•The world is a dangerous place, not because of those who do evil, but
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