Hi all,

I'm wondering how best to cite articles that are published one year as early-view but then published as part of a journal issue a following year.

With strictly print literature, when an article was actually published one year but the journal issue lists a previous year we might cite it as, for Example D,
Smith, A., Jones, B. (2005) A Paper On Worms. Worm Journal 1 (1) [2004], 10-20.

But nowadays we routinely have two publication dates. This matters for issues regarding the Principle of Priority, but also simply in how you order the articles in a bibliography or a taxonomic synonymy. I found the following model at the Biometrics journal site: http://www.biometrics.tibs.org/fpdoi.htm

Example A. Correct citation of Early View version:
1) Smith, A., Jones, B. (2004) A Paper On Worms. Worm Journal doi:10.1111/j.1234-4321.2004.01234.x 
Example B. Correct citation of print version:
1) Smith, A., Jones, B. (2005) A Paper On Worms. Worm Journal 1 (1), 10-20.
Example C. Incorrect citation of print version:
1) Smith, A., Jones, B. (2004) A Paper On Worms. Worm Journal 1 (1), 10-20.

If we follow these guidelines, I can see publishing a reference list where (if we want to cite the journal issue, for example in order to cite a page number) it looks like Author2 reversed a taxonomic decision the year before Author1 established it (because the Author1 paper was in early-view for so long before being assigned a journal issue).

Would you agree that it's best to list the article in a bibliography based only on one publication date? If there is a question of Priority, further scrutiny of the article itself would give you the earlier publication date. Or would it ever be advisable to list both publication dates, say as Example E:

Smith, A., Jones, B. (2004) A Paper On Worms. Worm Journal 1 (1) [2005], 10-20.

If this last (Example E) is the preferred method, do we use it only for specific matters where publication order is important, or should it be adopted for all references?

Thanks for your thoughts and/or references. Sorry for the long question/explanation!

Best regards, Colin


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