Judith, 

This sounds like part of my problem. I, too, won't use that optician again. A very expensive mistake. My lenses - high index (in order to fit the frame), anti-glare/anti-scratch coating - run approximately $450 (the frame is additional). Not covered by insurance. 

The glasses I have (that make me nauseous) were checked by another optometrist and there are 2 problems... The left lens is too strong by 1/4 diopter AND my prescription was too strong by 1/4 diopter, resulting in my left lens being too strong by 1/2 diopter. Also the frames are too wide for my face by slightly more than 2 cm (1cm each lens). Because of this there is more distortion at the outer edges (I have a very strong scrip). These are the ONLY frames the optical shop said they could use for my prescription, my only choice being the color of the wire. 

The optician who made them insists they are correct and will not work to fix them. The only thing offered was an appointment for a new refraction (at their usual fee), insisting my eyes have changed. My eyes have not changed in the course of a relatively short period of time.

K

From my iPhone. 

On Aug 12, 2016, at 5:25 AM, Judith Stoffer <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

RE: Cataract surgery for artists

I recently needed new eyeglasses with a new prescription, and also a diagnosis of early stage cataracts. Because of insurance, I didn't end up ordering the glasses from where I had the exam. Ordered both bifocals for computer/reading and bifocal sunglasses for distance/reading. Computer glasses were perfect. Sunglasses were clear at the right distances but I couldn't get both eyes to focus at the same time, and they induced nausea. Optician kept trying to convince me that I would get used to them, and his main objective was insisting they were ground properly and that they had done nothing wrong. I went back to the ophthalmologist (Hopkins, Wilmer Eye Institute) that had examined my eyes, and his assessment/measurement was that the blanks the lab had chosen to make the lenses were radically different, by two full diopters, and that was the source of the problem. The optometrist where the glasses were ordered had never heard of such a thing and has been treating me like I'm nuts. (Obviously, I will not be a repeat customer.)

Karen, does this lens blank choice sound like it might be contributing to your problem with those new glasses? Anyone else had a similar experience?

Judy


On Fri, Aug 12, 2016 at 1:00 AM, SCIART-L automatic digest system <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
Date:    Thu, 11 Aug 2016 15:44:05 -0500
From:    Karen Ackoff <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: Discussion: Cataract surgery for artists

Yes, I second the motion.

I’m not looking at cataract surgery yet. But I’m having difficulty since my optometrist of about 15 years retired. The first place I went told me I had a thinning macular layer in my eyes, which could lead to losing my sight. I was dubious, as they followed this with trying to sell me expensive vitamins. The next doctor I went to said there was no problem with my macular layer, but that I had early stage cataracts. I had glasses made there, and if I wear them, I quickly become nauseous. They insist the scrip is correct and I will get used to them, and they will not remake them. I tried a mail-order place just on a whim. But those glasses gave me double-vision, and I returned them (for a full refund, thankfully).

Went to yet a 3rd place. They actually showed me all the test results and imagery and I do not have a thinning macular layer, no do I have cataracts. The glasses that make me ill are made to the wrong scrip. I ordered new lenses for some old frames, and with any luck I will actually be able to see out of them.

Bruce, your vision sounds close to mine (my near vision focuses at about 3 inches). Do you have any problems finding a place to make your glasses? I’ve had this problem before when my optician retired. I get single vision distance lenses (can’t tolerate bifocals or progressive lenses - too much distortion), and I usually work with my nose to the drawing board sans glasses (most anyone can attest to this). If I need my mid-vision, I simply layer a pair of cheap reading glasses over my distance glasses, and this works well enough for computer work.

K




--
Judith A. Stoffer
Baltimore, MD, USA
443/676.8883

"Secu­rity is mostly a super­sti­tion. Avoid­ing dan­ger is no safer in the long run than out­right exposure. Life is either a dar­ing adven­ture, or nothing." –Helen Keller

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