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I'm curious to know if a person's experience with contact lenses could
accurately simulate the various implantable-lens options. I'm one of those
people who adjusted very quickly to "mono vision" lenses -- having one eye
corrected for close-up vision and the other for far. However, I was *never*
able to adjust to "multifocal" lenses that split the light -- everything
kept veering in and out of focus, and this aspect never cleared up for me.
So I wonder, does anyone out there know (or has anyone asked a doctor) if a
trial run with contact lenses would provide a patient with a sort of sneak
preview of what the different surgery choices would be like for them?

On Sun, Aug 14, 2016 at 1:35 PM, Julia Morgan-Scott <
[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Thanks for the great discussion about cataract surgery. I have developing
> cataracts, and although my doctor says mine aren't quite ready for surgery
> yet, I'd been concerned about what kind of lenses to get. After reading the
> discussion, I agree that near vision is most important to me. I don't mind
> wearing glasses for driving and far vision at all. One question: are there
> specific brands I should look for in the lens the doctor implants?
> Julia Morgan Scott
>
> On Fri, Aug 12, 2016 at 1:00 AM, SCIART-L automatic digest system <
> [log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
>> There are 14 messages totaling 2967 lines in this issue.
>>
>> Topics of the day:
>>
>>   1. Discussion: Cataract surgery for artists (10)
>>   2. FW: [SCIART] Surge protectors (2)
>>   3. Job opportunity: National Museum of Wildlife Art
>>   4. scam or no scam
>>
>> Need to leave or subscribe to the Sciart-L listserv? Follow the
>> instructions at
>> http://www.gnsi.org/resources/reviews/gnsi-sciart-l-listserv
>>
>> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
>> Date:    Thu, 11 Aug 2016 05:18:07 +0000
>> From:    "James A. Perkins" <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: Re: Discussion: Cataract surgery for artists
>>
>> Hi Linny,
>>
>> I've done quite a bit of research on this topic for myself and for
>> others. I developed cataracts in both eyes in my late 40s and had both eyes
>> done. My brother also had both eyes done in his 40s (bad eyes seem to run
>> in my family since both of us also developed retinal detachments in our
>> mid-50s). And I spent MANY hours discussing this topic on the phone with
>> our former listserv pal, the late Liz Day, before she had both of her eyes
>> done. Liz was particularly concerned about the effects of certain lenses on
>> contrast sensitivity and color perception.
>>
>> You basically have five options for intraocular lens replacement:
>>
>> 1. Monofocal. This is the simplest type of lens that focuses at only one
>> distance. You can choose to have the lens focus at any focal length you
>> want - near vision, distance vision, or even intermediate distance.
>>
>> 2. Toric lenses. This is a type of monofocal lens that also corrects for
>> astigmatism. If you have an astigmatism, these work really well, but they
>> have to be positioned very precisely within the eye. Make sure your surgeon
>> is certified to implant these and has lots of experience with them.
>>
>> 3. "Monovision". I think this is a poor term because it sounds so much
>> like monofocal. This is what others have described where you put a distance
>> lens in one eye and a close up lens in the other. As others have said, this
>> can be difficult to adjust to and may not result in good vision at ANY
>> distance. I'm not sure why some doctors push this option since I've never
>> heard anything good about it.
>>
>> 4. Multifocal lenses. This sounds like what you were talking about. These
>> lenses literally split the light coming into your eye into multiple beams
>> with different focal lengths. I'm aware of two such lenses using slightly
>> different technology. The AcrySof Restor depends on differing lighting
>> conditions to change the focal length. For example, in bright light, the
>> pupil constricts and the light is directed through the center of the lens
>> onto the fovea for better close-up vision. In low light, the pupil dilates,
>> allowing more light to hit the edges of the lens, which focuses it for
>> distance vision (this is great for driving at night but what if you happen
>> to be driving in bright light?). The other option, the Tecnis Multifocal,
>> uses somewhat different technology that supposedly doesn't depend on
>> differences in lighting conditions. Multifocal lenses are very popular
>> because they free people from having to wear glasses, but I don't think
>> either of these is a good option for an artist. Because the beam of light
>> is literally split into different focal lengths, less light hits the retina
>> at any given spot. According to the research I read, this results in
>> reduced visual acuity and reduced contrast sensitivity (i.e, reduced
>> ability to tell the difference between subtle shades of gray or colors).
>>
>> 5. Accommodative lenses. When we are young, the lens in our eye is small
>> and flexible. There are ciliary muscles in the eye that can stretch and
>> relax the lens to change the focal length, allowing us to easily change
>> focus from near to far. This process is called accommodation. The
>> Crystalens and Trulign Toric (both from Bausch & Lomb) flex with changes in
>> the ciliary muscle, similar to the eye's natural focusing mechanism (these
>> two lenses are identical, but the Trulign Toric also corrects astigmatism).
>> There's just one problem. According to my doctor, by the time most people
>> need cataract surgery, they have already lost much of the ability to
>> accommodate. This is because the lens continues to get thicker (and more
>> stiff) as we age, and eventually the ciliary muscles just stop working.
>> This is why so many people develop presbyopia later in life and need
>> glasses for both near and far vision. Even in my 40s my doctor didn't
>> recommend this option for me. I also read some research that, similar to
>> multifocal lenses, accommodative lenses give poorer contrast sensitivity
>> than plain old monofocal lenses. Again, not a great thing for an artist.
>>
>> After doing lots of research and discussing this at length with two eye
>> doctors, I decided to go with monofocal lenses with the same focal length
>> in both eyes. I did have an astigmatism in my right eye, so I had a toric
>> lens put in that eye. It completely fixed the astigmatism.
>>
>> When choosing a monofocal lens, most people choose either distance (for
>> driving) or close-up vision (for reading). Since I do all of my artwork on
>> the computer, I told my doctor to give me lenses with a focal length of
>> about 30 inches - the distance from my face to the computer screen. I
>> wanted to be able to work all day without glasses, even if it meant wearing
>> glasses for distance and reading. As it turns out, this was a pretty good
>> compromise because my close-up vision is good enough to read anything
>> except the tiny instructions on medicine bottles and my distance vision is
>> good enough to drive without glasses.
>>
>> Jim
>>
>>
>>
>> James A. Perkins, MFA, CMI, FAMI
>> Board Certified Medical Illustrator
>> Fellow, Association of Medical Illustrators
>>
>> Professor and Graduate Director
>> Medical Illustration
>> Rochester Institute of Technology
>> CBET 75-2129
>> 153 Lomb Memorial Drive
>> Rochester, NY 14623
>>
>> [log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>
>>
>>
>>
>> On Aug 10, 2016, at 10:26 PM, Linda Heagy wrote:
>>
>> Hi Linda,
>>
>> I will have both eyes done, but not at the same time. ... I thought they
>> could put in a lens that had both far away AND up-close vision in each eye?
>>
>> Good point, Linda. I may be confused about the procedure and lenses. I
>> was thinking that there was one lens that had the ability of both focal
>> powers of far away and up close. I was not thinking of having one focal for
>> distance in one eye and one for close-up in the other eye. No, that does
>> not sound like a promising solution to me at all !
>>
>> My last year visit with doctor alluded to coming new advances in lenses
>> and cataract surgery. Just how soon, I do not know and what those advances
>> are. So I was hoping I could hold out till those new advances were
>> available.... If they are even beneficial to me.
>>
>> Have you had cataract surgery and were you satisfied with the results?
>>
>> Best,
>> Linny
>>
>> ___________________________
>> Linny Heagy
>> DBA: Linny/Designer, Illustrator
>> Arlington, TX
>>
>> Need to leave or subscribe to the Sciart-L listserv? Follow the
>> instructions at
>> http://www.gnsi.org/resources/reviews/gnsi-sciart-l-listserv
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date:    Thu, 11 Aug 2016 05:33:53 +0000
>> From:    "James A. Perkins" <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: Re: Discussion: Cataract surgery for artists
>>
>> Linny,
>>
>> I just remembered that you also asked about the added cost of the
>> different kind of lenses. I forgot to address that in my previous post.
>>
>> Most insurance covers the cost of a monofocal lens since it's the
>> simplest and cheapest option. Sounds like that's the case with your
>> Medicare and Supplemental insurance. So you would be responsible to pay the
>> surcharge for the fancier lenses.
>>
>> As I recall, a toric lens (for astigmatism) was a few hundred dollars
>> extra.
>>
>> A multifocal lenses was about $500 extra (per eye).
>>
>> The accommodative lens was the most expensive - about $1000 per eye
>> beyond what the insurance would pay.
>>
>> This was over five years ago, so the surcharge would probably be even
>> greater now. But I don't recommend either the multifocal or accommodative
>> lenses anyway, so the price is not an issue.
>>
>> There would be no surcharge is you went with "monovision", i.e., one eye
>> for close-up and one eye for distance, because that's simply implanting
>> monofocal lenses with different focal lengths in the two different eyes.
>> But I don't recommend this option either.
>>
>> Jim
>>
>>
>> James A. Perkins, MFA, CMI, FAMI
>> Board Certified Medical Illustrator
>> Fellow, Association of Medical Illustrators
>>
>> Professor and Graduate Director
>> Medical Illustration
>> Rochester Institute of Technology
>> CBET 75-2129
>> 153 Lomb Memorial Drive
>> Rochester, NY 14623
>>
>> [log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>
>>
>>
>>
>> On Aug 10, 2016, at 10:26 PM, Linda Heagy wrote:
>>
>>
>> On Aug 10, 2016, at 4:53 PM, Linda Heagy <[log in to unmask]<mailto:a
>> [log in to unmask]>> wrote:
>>
>> Re: [SCIART]  Discussion: Cataract surgery for artists
>> Hi everyone. I have been a member for some years now but rarely take part
>> in the discussions although I have enjoyed and benefited from your great
>> comments.
>>
>> To fill you in on my background, I am 70 years old. Been a professional
>> artist my whole life. I started out as a Fashion Illustrator, Graphic
>> Designer, Art Director and Creative Director. Helped a friend establish
>> Houragency Inc. (an ad agency in Ithaca, N.Y, back in the ‘70’s),  then
>> moved to Florida where I had my own Creative Studio in Coral Gables, FL.
>>
>> Moved to Texas for a position as Art Director at Neiman Marcus in Dallas.
>> Then left Advertising profession to pursue a Horticultural degree and
>> eventually became a scientific botanical illustrator and designer of Floras.
>>
>> Now, to my main reason for contacting my fellow members.
>> I have always had keen vision up-close but used glasses to see far away.
>> However, now I use reading glasses on my up-close work and for reading fine
>> print.
>>
>> At 70 I (like many others my age) have cataracts developing. Specifically
>> in my right eye. My Doctor is telling me I need the surgery to remove
>> cataract and replace with a lenses and is asking me would I prefer one to
>> see far away or one to see close.  As artists, you know my answer would be
>> BOTH!
>>
>> As artists, would not the logical answer be BOTH lenses: One for far away
>> and one for up close. My doctor says they can put in both but Medicare and
>> my supplemental insurance will not pay or the 2nd lens.
>>
>>
>> Question to you out there who have had the surgery and the same natural
>> close up vision:
>>
>> How much was the cost of the second lens?
>>
>> Did the surgery successfully work for both up close and far away vision?
>>
>> Was there an adjustment time?
>>
>> Any other comments to share with me that might be helpful re: this
>> discussion?
>>
>> Linny Heagy
>> DBA: Linny/Designer, Illustrator
>> Arlington, TX
>>
>> Need to leave or subscribe to the Sciart-L listserv? Follow the
>> instructions at
>> http://www.gnsi.org/resources/reviews/gnsi-sciart-l-listserv
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date:    Thu, 11 Aug 2016 06:41:31 +0000
>> From:    Tiffany Miller Russell <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: FW: [SCIART] Surge protectors
>>
>> From my husband, the IT guy:
>>
>> ~Tiffany
>>
>>
>> On 8/10/16 3:04 PM, "Steve Russell" <[log in to unmask]<mailto:
>> [log in to unmask]>> wrote:
>>
>> Linda,
>> First, the battery backup outlets are also surge protection. You'd plug
>> your computer into the battery backup and the monitor into the surge
>> protection.
>>
>> Many UPSs include communication cables to attach to your computer to
>> inform your computer the status of the battery. There is either software
>> provided or with the operating system to set up situations where your
>> computer can either shut down or hibernate.
>>
>> Most desktops will do just fine with an APC 650 VA UPS. They cost around
>> $70.00. It will give you enough run time for your system to either shutdown
>> or hibernate.
>>
>> Hope this helps,
>> Steve Russell
>>
>> From: Tiffany Miller Russell [mailto:[log in to unmask]]
>> Sent: Wednesday, August 10, 2016 2:42 PM
>> To: Steve Russell <[log in to unmask]<mailto:
>> [log in to unmask]>>
>> Subject: Fwd: [SCIART] Surge protectors
>>
>>
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>> Begin forwarded message:
>> From: Linda Feltner <[log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]
>> >>
>> Date: August 10, 2016 at 2:21:47 PM MDT
>> To: <[log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>>
>> Subject: [SCIART] Surge protectors
>> Reply-To: SciArt-L Discussion List-for Natural Science Illustration- <
>> [log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>>
>> Ah, the Power!!!!! Yeah, until lightning strikes!
>>
>> I've been a bit mind-blown trying to research battery backup and surge
>> protection systems.
>> TMI....to say the least.
>>
>> Amelia said she uses an APC Smart-UPS 750VA Tower UPS.
>>
>> I am looking at ones around $100, however.
>>
>> What I am finding in the descriptions, is that some say the battery
>> preserves the backup ability for 3-5 minutes until you can properly shut
>> down your computer (that is if you're there in the office, eh?). Some say
>> they have 4 outlets for "battery" and 4 outlets for "surge", Why isn't
>> there both?
>>
>> Does anyone have any advice?
>>
>> Best,
>> Linda
>> ___________________________
>> Linda M. Feltner Artist, LLC
>> Guild of Natural Science Illustrators, President
>> (520) 803-0538
>> www.lindafeltner.com<http://www.lindafeltner.com>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> ________________________________________________
>>
>> Need to leave or subscribe to the Sciart-L listserv? Follow the
>> instructions at
>> http://www.gnsi.org/resources/reviews/gnsi-sciart-l-listserv
>>
>> Need to leave or subscribe to the Sciart-L listserv? Follow the
>> instructions at
>> http://www.gnsi.org/resources/reviews/gnsi-sciart-l-listserv
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date:    Thu, 11 Aug 2016 06:01:56 -0700
>> From:    Linda Feltner <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: Re: FW: [SCIART] Surge protectors
>>
>> Thank you Tiffany and Steve...
>>
>> I have been researching and looking at models and options.
>>
>> A question that remains unanswered:  "gives you enough run time for your
>> system to either shut down or hibernate". I've read that while shopping.
>> That is if it's turned on, and you are there to either shut down or
>> hibernate. I've been known to run to the post office and leave it on, or be
>> drawn out of the studio for a couple of hours. I think I read on some
>> reviews that the software allows for some choices, so it will shut down
>> gently or hibernate ON IT'S OWN. Is that what they mean?
>>
>> That said, during monsoon, I do not walk away from the studio and leave
>> the computer on. I unplug from the wall. If I hear thunder, I have to
>> unplug.
>>
>> I called Newegg, I've purchased from them before. Asking if some of their
>> models (nice sale on some right now) if the software worked on a Mac OS. He
>> said I'd have to call the manufacturer.  Many of these units say the
>> software will work on a PC, but that has many meanings. I would hate to get
>> a unit in here only to learn the software wasn't compatible with my
>> software, and not show all the bells and whistles it provides on other
>> machines -- which might be the ability to tell it to either shut down or
>> hibernate.
>>
>> Thank you,
>> Linda
>> ___________________________
>> Linda M. Feltner Artist, LLC
>> Guild of Natural Science Illustrators, President
>> (520) 803-0538
>> www.lindafeltner.com
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> On Aug 10, 2016, at 11:41 PM, Tiffany Miller Russell wrote:
>>
>> > From my husband, the IT guy:
>> >
>> > ~Tiffany
>> >
>> >
>> > On 8/10/16 3:04 PM, "Steve Russell" <[log in to unmask]>
>> wrote:
>> >
>> > Linda,
>> > First, the battery backup outlets are also surge protection. You’d plug
>> your computer into the battery backup and the monitor into the surge
>> protection.
>> >
>> > Many UPSs include communication cables to attach to your computer to
>> inform your computer the status of the battery. There is either software
>> provided or with the operating system to set up situations where your
>> computer can either shut down or hibernate.
>> >
>> > Most desktops will do just fine with an APC 650 VA UPS. They cost
>> around $70.00. It will give you enough run time for your system to either
>> shutdown or hibernate.
>> >
>> > Hope this helps,
>> > Steve Russell
>> >
>> > From: Tiffany Miller Russell [mailto:[log in to unmask]]
>> > Sent: Wednesday, August 10, 2016 2:42 PM
>> > To: Steve Russell <[log in to unmask]>
>> > Subject: Fwd: [SCIART] Surge protectors
>> >
>> >
>>
>>
>> Need to leave or subscribe to the Sciart-L listserv? Follow the
>> instructions at
>> http://www.gnsi.org/resources/reviews/gnsi-sciart-l-listserv
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date:    Thu, 11 Aug 2016 09:05:34 -0400
>> From:    Bruce Bartrug <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: Re: Discussion: Cataract surgery for artists
>>
>> Very interesting, Chris and Jim, and thank you both.
>>
>> Reading through the articles about multifocal lens replacements reminds me
>> of my experience with "progressive" (multifocal) lenses for standard
>> eyeglasses.  In my day job as a pharmacist I needed the multifocal lenses
>> and wore them constantly, including while driving.  When I began to have
>> problems seeing clearly in my right eye and the cataract was noticed, I
>> needed to change the right lens prescription.  Since I would probably soon
>> need to change the right lens again (after cataract surgery), I opted to
>> chang the right lens in a standard pair of bifocal glasses that I wear
>> when
>> using a camera or binoculars.  Since they are now the glasses I use for
>> driving, I've discovered these are better for that activity than
>> progressives....mainly because the peripheral vision is as clear as that
>> directly in front of me....with progressive lenses one must look directly
>> at a person/book/whatever as the progressive part of the lens is hourglass
>> shaped.  As I became accustomed to using the bifocals I've noticed the
>> accommodation difficulties at various distances is not the problem I had
>> expected, and only becomes noticeable at some middle distances from about
>> 3
>> feet up to about reading distance.
>>
>> This, and the warnings about contrast, etc., in the articles cited by
>> Chris, confirms my notion that single focal length lens replacements of
>> some near distance will most likely be my choice.  Since my forties I've
>> always had three pairs of glasses.....a progressive pair for work and
>> driving, a single focal length pair for reading, and another single focal
>> length pair for computer work.  This occasionally led to extensive
>> searches
>> through the house :), but that was a small issue compared to having the
>> ability to move my eyes when reading or using a computer, instead of
>> constantly turning my neck when using progressive lenses (to keep the
>> hourglass aimed at what I was doing/reading.)
>>
>> This coincides with photographic lenses......single focal length (or
>> prime)
>> lenses have always had the advantage when edge to edge sharpness and high
>> contrast were needed.  Zooms (multifocal lenses) could come close, but
>> were
>> mainly for convenience.  This has changed in recent years, so multifocal,
>> or other, lens replacements shouldn't automatically be rejected.  I
>> probably will choose single focal distance replacements, but what I'm
>> really going to miss is the ability to see the finest detail simply be
>> removing my glasses and using my near-sighted eyes which focus at about 5
>> inches.
>>
>> I'll let you know what I learn, Linny and Brie.
>>
>> Interesting discussion, and thanks to everyone,
>> bab
>>
>>
>>
>> On Thu, Aug 11, 2016 at 1:33 AM, James A. Perkins <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>
>> > Linny,
>> >
>> > I just remembered that you also asked about the added cost of the
>> > different kind of lenses. I forgot to address that in my previous post.
>> >
>> >
>>
>> Need to leave or subscribe to the Sciart-L listserv? Follow the
>> instructions at
>> http://www.gnsi.org/resources/reviews/gnsi-sciart-l-listserv
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date:    Thu, 11 Aug 2016 10:29:15 -0400
>> From:    OC Carlisle <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: Re: Discussion: Cataract surgery for artists
>>
>> Thank you all for this enlightening discussion. I will probably encounter
>> this issue in the future. Now I use trifocal glasses which has served me
>> well. Thanks again!
>>
>> OC Carlisle
>> Scientific Illustration, Photographic Fine Art
>> Guild of Natural Science Illustrators
>> [log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]
>> >
>> carlisleillustration.squarespace.com <http://carlisleillustration.s
>> quarespace.com/>
>> “Take Flight And Soar With Your Dreams”
>>
>>
>>
>> > On Aug 11, 2016, at 9:05 AM, Bruce Bartrug <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> >
>> > Very interesting, Chris and Jim, and thank you both.
>> >
>> > Reading through the articles about multifocal lens replacements reminds
>> me of my experience with "progressive" (multifocal) lenses for standard
>> eyeglasses.  In my day job as a pharmacist I needed the multifocal lenses
>> and wore them constantly, including while driving.  When I began to have
>> problems seeing clearly in my right eye and the cataract was noticed, I
>> needed to change the right lens prescription.  Since I would probably soon
>> need to change the right lens again (after cataract surgery), I opted to
>> chang the right lens in a standard pair of bifocal glasses that I wear when
>> using a camera or binoculars.  Since they are now the glasses I use for
>> driving, I've discovered these are better for that activity than
>> progressives....mainly because the peripheral vision is as clear as that
>> directly in front of me....with progressive lenses one must look directly
>> at a person/book/whatever as the progressive part of the lens is hourglass
>> shaped.  As I became accustomed to using the bifocals I've noticed the
>> accommodation difficulties at various distances is not the problem I had
>> expected, and only becomes noticeable at some middle distances from about 3
>> feet up to about reading distance.
>> >
>> > This, and the warnings about contrast, etc., in the articles cited by
>> Chris, confirms my notion that single focal length lens replacements of
>> some near distance will most likely be my choice.  Since my forties I've
>> always had three pairs of glasses.....a progressive pair for work and
>> driving, a single focal length pair for reading, and another single focal
>> length pair for computer work.  This occasionally led to extensive searches
>> through the house :), but that was a small issue compared to having the
>> ability to move my eyes when reading or using a computer, instead of
>> constantly turning my neck when using progressive lenses (to keep the
>> hourglass aimed at what I was doing/reading.)
>> >
>> > This coincides with photographic lenses......single focal length (or
>> prime) lenses have always had the advantage when edge to edge sharpness and
>> high contrast were needed.  Zooms (multifocal lenses) could come close, but
>> were mainly for convenience.  This has changed in recent years, so
>> multifocal, or other, lens replacements shouldn't automatically be
>> rejected.  I probably will choose single focal distance replacements, but
>> what I'm really going to miss is the ability to see the finest detail
>> simply be removing my glasses and using my near-sighted eyes which focus at
>> about 5 inches.
>> >
>> > I'll let you know what I learn, Linny and Brie.
>> >
>> > Interesting discussion, and thanks to everyone,
>> > bab
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> > On Thu, Aug 11, 2016 at 1:33 AM, James A. Perkins <[log in to unmask]
>> <mailto:[log in to unmask]>> wrote:
>> > Linny,
>> >
>> > I just remembered that you also asked about the added cost of the
>> different kind of lenses. I forgot to address that in my previous post.
>> >
>> >
>> > ________________________________________________
>> >
>> > Need to leave or subscribe to the Sciart-L listserv? Follow the
>> instructions at
>> > http://www.gnsi.org/resources/reviews/gnsi-sciart-l-listserv <
>> http://www.gnsi.org/resources/reviews/gnsi-sciart-l-listserv>
>>
>>
>> Need to leave or subscribe to the Sciart-L listserv? Follow the
>> instructions at
>> http://www.gnsi.org/resources/reviews/gnsi-sciart-l-listserv
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date:    Thu, 11 Aug 2016 10:37:46 -0400
>> From:    Diana Marques <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: Job opportunity: National Museum of Wildlife Art
>>
>>
>> A job opportunity that may be of interest, instructions for applying
>> included:
>>
>>
>> Assistant Curator of Youth and Adult Education  Jackson, WY
>> National Museum of Wildlife Art
>>
>> Job Description:
>> Assistant Curator of Youth and Adult Education is a full-time position in
>> the Museum’s Education & Exhibits Department. This staff member is directly
>> responsible for the creation, implementation, & evaluation of education
>> programs for youth and adults. Youth programs, preK-12th grade, occur both
>> onsite and offsite and include community collaborations. Adult programs
>> include films, lectures, and art making that enrich exhibit themes. Other
>> major responsibilities include management of our summer internship program
>> (promoting, organizing applications, interviewing, and at times supervising
>> ;) management of our student scholarship programs; support of our volunteer
>> program (including coordinating some educational opportunities for
>> volunteers ;) and management of our Open Studio (art making space for all
>> ages.)
>> The Assistant Curator of Youth and Adult Education works with the Curator
>> of Education and Exhibits, and the Assistant Curator of Education and
>> Exhibits, to shape and promote the National Museum of Wildlife Art’s
>> mission as an educational resource.
>> The Assistant Curator: Youth and Adult Education reports to the Curator
>> of Education and Exhibits
>>
>> Deliver cover letter, résumé, and references at the National Museum of
>> Wildlife Art, 2820 Rungius Road; mail résumé to Steve Seamons, National
>> Museum of Wildlife Art, PO Box 6825, Jackson, WY 83002; or email to
>> [log in to unmask]
>> The NMWA is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Applicants for positions at
>> the National Museum of Wildlife Art are considered without regard to race,
>> creed, color, country of origin, sex, age, citizenship, disability, marital
>> status, or sexual orientation.
>> Posted August 2nd
>>
>>
>> ***
>> Diana Marques
>> GNSI Outreach Director
>> [log in to unmask]
>> Need to leave or subscribe to the Sciart-L listserv? Follow the
>> instructions at
>> http://www.gnsi.org/resources/reviews/gnsi-sciart-l-listserv
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date:    Thu, 11 Aug 2016 15:44:05 -0500
>> From:    Karen Ackoff <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: Re: Discussion: Cataract surgery for artists
>>
>> Yes, I second the motion.
>>
>> I’m not looking at cataract surgery yet. But I’m having difficulty since
>> my optometrist of about 15 years retired. The first place I went told me I
>> had a thinning macular layer in my eyes, which could lead to losing my
>> sight. I was dubious, as they followed this with trying to sell me
>> expensive vitamins. The next doctor I went to said there was no problem
>> with my macular layer, but that I had early stage cataracts. I had glasses
>> made there, and if I wear them, I quickly become nauseous. They insist the
>> scrip is correct and I will get used to them, and they will not remake
>> them. I tried a mail-order place just on a whim. But those glasses gave me
>> double-vision, and I returned them (for a full refund, thankfully).
>>
>> Went to yet a 3rd place. They actually showed me all the test results and
>> imagery and I do not have a thinning macular layer, no do I have cataracts.
>> The glasses that make me ill are made to the wrong scrip. I ordered new
>> lenses for some old frames, and with any luck I will actually be able to
>> see out of them.
>>
>> Bruce, your vision sounds close to mine (my near vision focuses at about
>> 3 inches). Do you have any problems finding a place to make your glasses?
>> I’ve had this problem before when my optician retired. I get single vision
>> distance lenses (can’t tolerate bifocals or progressive lenses - too much
>> distortion), and I usually work with my nose to the drawing board sans
>> glasses (most anyone can attest to this). If I need my mid-vision, I simply
>> layer a pair of cheap reading glasses over my distance glasses, and this
>> works well enough for computer work.
>>
>> K
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> > On Aug 11, 2016, at 9:29 AM, OC Carlisle <[log in to unmask]>
>> wrote:
>> >
>> > Thank you all for this enlightening discussion. I will probably
>> encounter this issue in the future. Now I use trifocal glasses which has
>> served me well. Thanks again!
>> >
>> > OC Carlisle
>> > Scientific Illustration, Photographic Fine Art
>> > Guild of Natural Science Illustrators
>> > [log in to unmask] <mailto:carlisleillustrate@bel
>> lsouth.net>
>> > carlisleillustration.squarespace.com <http://carlisleillustration.s
>> quarespace.com/>
>> > “Take Flight And Soar With Your Dreams”
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >> On Aug 11, 2016, at 9:05 AM, Bruce Bartrug <[log in to unmask]
>> <mailto:[log in to unmask]>> wrote:
>> >>
>> >> Very interesting, Chris and Jim, and thank you both.
>> >>
>> >> Reading through the articles about multifocal lens replacements
>> reminds me of my experience with "progressive" (multifocal) lenses for
>> standard eyeglasses.  In my day job as a pharmacist I needed the multifocal
>> lenses and wore them constantly, including while driving.  When I began to
>> have problems seeing clearly in my right eye and the cataract was noticed,
>> I needed to change the right lens prescription.  Since I would probably
>> soon need to change the right lens again (after cataract surgery), I opted
>> to chang the right lens in a standard pair of bifocal glasses that I wear
>> when using a camera or binoculars.  Since they are now the glasses I use
>> for driving, I've discovered these are better for that activity than
>> progressives....mainly because the peripheral vision is as clear as that
>> directly in front of me....with progressive lenses one must look directly
>> at a person/book/whatever as the progressive part of the lens is hourglass
>> shaped.  As I became accustomed to using the bifocals I've noticed the
>> accommodation difficulties at various distances is not the problem I had
>> expected, and only becomes noticeable at some middle distances from about 3
>> feet up to about reading distance.
>> >>
>> >> This, and the warnings about contrast, etc., in the articles cited by
>> Chris, confirms my notion that single focal length lens replacements of
>> some near distance will most likely be my choice.  Since my forties I've
>> always had three pairs of glasses.....a progressive pair for work and
>> driving, a single focal length pair for reading, and another single focal
>> length pair for computer work.  This occasionally led to extensive searches
>> through the house :), but that was a small issue compared to having the
>> ability to move my eyes when reading or using a computer, instead of
>> constantly turning my neck when using progressive lenses (to keep the
>> hourglass aimed at what I was doing/reading.)
>> >>
>> >> This coincides with photographic lenses......single focal length (or
>> prime) lenses have always had the advantage when edge to edge sharpness and
>> high contrast were needed.  Zooms (multifocal lenses) could come close, but
>> were mainly for convenience.  This has changed in recent years, so
>> multifocal, or other, lens replacements shouldn't automatically be
>> rejected.  I probably will choose single focal distance replacements, but
>> what I'm really going to miss is the ability to see the finest detail
>> simply be removing my glasses and using my near-sighted eyes which focus at
>> about 5 inches.
>> >>
>> >> I'll let you know what I learn, Linny and Brie.
>> >>
>> >> Interesting discussion, and thanks to everyone,
>> >> bab
>> >>
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> On Thu, Aug 11, 2016 at 1:33 AM, James A. Perkins <[log in to unmask]
>> <mailto:[log in to unmask]>> wrote:
>> >> Linny,
>> >>
>> >> I just remembered that you also asked about the added cost of the
>> different kind of lenses. I forgot to address that in my previous post.
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> ________________________________________________
>> >>
>> >> Need to leave or subscribe to the Sciart-L listserv? Follow the
>> instructions at
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>> http://www.gnsi.org/resources/reviews/gnsi-sciart-l-listserv>
>> >
>> > ________________________________________________
>> >
>> > Need to leave or subscribe to the Sciart-L listserv? Follow the
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>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date:    Thu, 11 Aug 2016 16:55:00 -0400
>> From:    Patricia Savage <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: Re: Discussion: Cataract surgery for artists
>>
>> Cool idea about putting reading glasses on top of glasses. I am going to
>> try that.
>>
>> You guys are lucky. Neither of my eyes focus together at any distance
>> anymore. Sigh. Been a real pain to do tight work. And trying to read a
>> book, heavy sigh again. Great suggestion Karen!
>>
>> Patricia Savage
>> Mayapple Studio
>> www.psavageart.com
>>
>> Sent from my iPad
>>
>> > On Aug 11, 2016, at 4:44 PM, Karen Ackoff <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> >
>> > Yes, I second the motion.
>> >
>> > I’m not looking at cataract surgery yet. But I’m having difficulty
>> since my optometrist of about 15 years retired. The first place I went told
>> me I had a thinning macular layer in my eyes, which could lead to losing my
>> sight. I was dubious, as they followed this with trying to sell me
>> expensive vitamins. The next doctor I went to said there was no problem
>> with my macular layer, but that I had early stage cataracts. I had glasses
>> made there, and if I wear them, I quickly become nauseous. They insist the
>> scrip is correct and I will get used to them, and they will not remake
>> them. I tried a mail-order place just on a whim. But those glasses gave me
>> double-vision, and I returned them (for a full refund, thankfully).
>> >
>> > Went to yet a 3rd place. They actually showed me all the test results
>> and imagery and I do not have a thinning macular layer, no do I have
>> cataracts. The glasses that make me ill are made to the wrong scrip. I
>> ordered new lenses for some old frames, and with any luck I will actually
>> be able to see out of them.
>> >
>> > Bruce, your vision sounds close to mine (my near vision focuses at
>> about 3 inches). Do you have any problems finding a place to make your
>> glasses? I’ve had this problem before when my optician retired. I get
>> single vision distance lenses (can’t tolerate bifocals or progressive
>> lenses - too much distortion), and I usually work with my nose to the
>> drawing board sans glasses (most anyone can attest to this). If I need my
>> mid-vision, I simply layer a pair of cheap reading glasses over my distance
>> glasses, and this works well enough for computer work.
>> >
>> > K
>> >
>> > ________________________________________________
>> >
>> > Need to leave or subscribe to the Sciart-L listserv? Follow the
>> instructions at
>> > http://www.gnsi.org/resources/reviews/gnsi-sciart-l-listserv
>>
>> Need to leave or subscribe to the Sciart-L listserv? Follow the
>> instructions at
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>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date:    Thu, 11 Aug 2016 14:03:51 -0700
>> From:    Linda Feltner <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: Re: Discussion: Cataract surgery for artists
>>
>> Ben has double vision now, it's a muscular issue. He wears "prism"
>> lenses, which pulls the focus together so he doesn't see two birds flying
>> instead of one.
>>
>> L.
>> ___________________________
>> Linda M. Feltner Artist, LLC
>> Guild of Natural Science Illustrators, President
>> (520) 803-0538
>> www.lindafeltner.com
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> On Aug 11, 2016, at 1:55 PM, Patricia Savage wrote:
>>
>> > Cool idea about putting reading glasses on top of glasses. I am going
>> to try that.
>> >
>> > You guys are lucky. Neither of my eyes focus together at any distance
>> anymore. Sigh. Been a real pain to do tight work. And trying to read a
>> book, heavy sigh again. Great suggestion Karen!
>> >
>> > Patricia Savage
>> > Mayapple Studio
>> > www.psavageart.com
>> >
>> > Sent from my iPad
>> >
>> > On Aug 11, 2016, at 4:44 PM, Karen Ackoff <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> >
>> >> Yes, I second the motion.
>> >>
>> >> I’m not looking at cataract surgery yet. But I’m having difficulty
>> since my optometrist of about 15 years retired. The first place I went told
>> me I had a thinning macular layer in my eyes, which could lead to losing my
>> sight. I was dubious, as they followed this with trying to sell me
>> expensive vitamins. The next doctor I went to said there was no problem
>> with my macular layer, but that I had early stage cataracts. I had glasses
>> made there, and if I wear them, I quickly become nauseous. They insist the
>> scrip is correct and I will get used to them, and they will not remake
>> them. I tried a mail-order place just on a whim. But those glasses gave me
>> double-vision, and I returned them (for a full refund, thankfully).
>> >>
>> >> Went to yet a 3rd place. They actually showed me all the test results
>> and imagery and I do not have a thinning macular layer, no do I have
>> cataracts. The glasses that make me ill are made to the wrong scrip. I
>> ordered new lenses for some old frames, and with any luck I will actually
>> be able to see out of them.
>> >>
>> >> Bruce, your vision sounds close to mine (my near vision focuses at
>> about 3 inches). Do you have any problems finding a place to make your
>> glasses? I’ve had this problem before when my optician retired. I get
>> single vision distance lenses (can’t tolerate bifocals or progressive
>> lenses - too much distortion), and I usually work with my nose to the
>> drawing board sans glasses (most anyone can attest to this). If I need my
>> mid-vision, I simply layer a pair of cheap reading glasses over my distance
>> glasses, and this works well enough for computer work.
>> >>
>> >> K
>> >>
>> >> ________________________________________________
>> >>
>> >> Need to leave or subscribe to the Sciart-L listserv? Follow the
>> instructions at
>> >> http://www.gnsi.org/resources/reviews/gnsi-sciart-l-listserv
>> >
>> > ________________________________________________
>> >
>> > Need to leave or subscribe to the Sciart-L listserv? Follow the
>> instructions at
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>>
>>
>> Need to leave or subscribe to the Sciart-L listserv? Follow the
>> instructions at
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>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date:    Thu, 11 Aug 2016 17:20:41 -0400
>> From:    Bruce Bartrug <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: Re: Discussion: Cataract surgery for artists
>>
>> Karen, I have no trouble getting correct and well-fitted glasses.  I've
>> used the same optician and the same ophthalmologist for 30 years.   The
>> doctor, an excellent surgeon, is winding down to retirement, but he has a
>> younger partner that I'll be seeing on Monday.  Too, I live in an area of
>> small towns....if you mess people up you go out of business in a flash.
>>
>> Need to leave or subscribe to the Sciart-L listserv? Follow the
>> instructions at
>> http://www.gnsi.org/resources/reviews/gnsi-sciart-l-listserv
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date:    Thu, 11 Aug 2016 23:40:56 +0000
>> From:    Will Smith <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: Re: Discussion: Cataract surgery for artists
>>
>> Great discussion. Thanks to you all for the information provided. I
>> especially liked the idea of a monocle and fencing scar. Very becoming.
>>
>> From: SciArt-L Discussion List-for Natural Science Illustration- [mailto:
>> [log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Linda Heagy
>> Sent: Thursday, 11 August 2016 6:54 AM
>> To: [log in to unmask]
>> Subject: Re: [SCIART] Discussion: Cataract surgery for artists
>>
>>
>> Hi everyone. I have been a member for some years now but rarely take part
>> in the discussions although I have enjoyed and benefited from your great
>> comments.
>>
>> To fill you in on my background, I am 70 years old. Been a professional
>> artist my whole life. I started out as a Fashion Illustrator, Graphic
>> Designer, Art Director and Creative Director. Helped a friend establish
>> Houragency Inc. (an ad agency in Ithaca, N.Y, back in the '70's),  then
>> moved to Florida where I had my own Creative Studio in Coral Gables, FL.
>>
>> Moved to Texas for a position as Art Director at Neiman Marcus in Dallas.
>> Then left Advertising profession to pursue a Horticultural degree and
>> eventually became a scientific botanical illustrator and designer of Floras.
>>
>> Now, to my main reason for contacting my fellow members.
>> I have always had keen vision up-close but used glasses to see far away.
>> However, now I use reading glasses on my up-close work and for reading fine
>> print.
>>
>> At 70 I (like many others my age) have cataracts developing. Specifically
>> in my right eye. My Doctor is telling me I need the surgery to remove
>> cataract and replace with a lenses and is asking me would I prefer one to
>> see far away or one to see close.  As artists, you know my answer would be
>> BOTH!
>>
>> As artists, would not the logical answer be BOTH lenses: One for far away
>> and one for up close. My doctor says they can put in both but Medicare and
>> my supplemental insurance will not pay or the 2nd lens.
>>
>>
>> Question to you out there who have had the surgery and the same natural
>> close up vision:
>>
>> How much was the cost of the second lens?
>>
>> Did the surgery successfully work for both up close and far away vision?
>>
>> Was there an adjustment time?
>>
>> Any other comments to share with me that might be helpful re: this
>> discussion?
>>
>> Linny Heagy
>> DBA: Linny/Designer, Illustrator
>> Arlington, TX
>>
>>
>>
>> ________________________________________________
>>
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>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date:    Thu, 11 Aug 2016 21:40:59 -0500
>> From:    Karen Ackoff <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: Re: Discussion: Cataract surgery for artists
>>
>> Bruce,
>>
>> You are lucky to have had the same optician for so long.
>>
>> Years ago, when I was in college, I had a pair of glasses made and had
>> trouble with them. I tended to trip and fall down stairs a lot. Back then,
>> I required prisms in my lenses to level out my vision. Turns out they
>> reversed the prisms, making the problem worse. Not enough to give me
>> obvious double vision but enough to distort things so that I misjudged
>> things like where the steps were. They kept telling me I’d adjust.
>>
>> I’m hoping the optometrist/optician I saw last week is "the one". I pick
>> up a new pair (old frames, new lenses) in about a week.
>>
>> K
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> > On Aug 11, 2016, at 4:20 PM, Bruce Bartrug <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> >
>> > Karen, I have no trouble getting correct and well-fitted glasses.  I've
>> used the same optician and the same ophthalmologist for 30 years.   The
>> doctor, an excellent surgeon, is winding down to retirement, but he has a
>> younger partner that I'll be seeing on Monday.  Too, I live in an area of
>> small towns....if you mess people up you go out of business in a flash.
>> >
>> >
>> > ________________________________________________
>> >
>> > Need to leave or subscribe to the Sciart-L listserv? Follow the
>> instructions at
>> > http://www.gnsi.org/resources/reviews/gnsi-sciart-l-listserv <
>> http://www.gnsi.org/resources/reviews/gnsi-sciart-l-listserv>
>>
>>
>> Need to leave or subscribe to the Sciart-L listserv? Follow the
>> instructions at
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>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date:    Thu, 11 Aug 2016 20:44:09 -0700
>> From:    Linda Ann Vorobik <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: scam or no scam
>>
>> Hi all, long time no email from me.
>>
>> Question...this looks like scam to me; let me know what you think.
>> Thanks much, lav
>> ____________
>> Am interested in some of your products, do you ship to Switzerland and
>> accept US issued credit card as payment?, you will contact my shipper
>> who handles all of my shipment, they pick up the items at your location
>> and deliver directly to my store doorstep without hassle.
>>
>> Let me know if i can e-mail you what am interested in ordering.
>>
>> Thank you.
>>
>> --
>> Linda Ann Vorobik, PhD Botanist, Botanical Artist
>> www.VorobikBotanicalArt.com, blogging at: http://vorobikbotanicalart.blo
>> gspot.com/
>> PO Box 866, Lopez Island, WA 98261; 360-468-3188; cell 510-520-2423
>>
>>
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>> ------------------------------
>>
>> End of SCIART-L Digest - 10 Aug 2016 to 11 Aug 2016 (#2016-134)
>> ***************************************************************
>>
>
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>
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-- 
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Program Coordinator and Instructor, Science Illustration Program
CSU Monterey Bay • 100 Campus Center • Seaside, CA 93955-8001
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