Print

Print


Yes, it's a thermal transfer. We haven't swapped out any of the ribbons
since we got it, so everything should be in the correct orientation.

I need to find out more about what was specifically used to clear the
specimens. There might have been something extra added or a contaminant
worked its way in somehow

Thanks for the heads up about DEET. We occasionally pre-print data labels
for use in the field when we know where, when, and how we'll be collecting
before we go.

Cheers,

Mike

On Tue, Aug 2, 2016 at 9:28 AM, Christine Johnson <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> This is a thermal transfer printer, right Mike (Ferro)?
>
> You may have to check that the print was on the proper side of the
> Poly-tag paper (if that is what you are using) and that the temperature
> setting was hot enough so the ribbon ink melts into the special paper.
>
> We had a one-time issue where the ink came off of a few labels in a loan
> return of dissected specimens that were stored in 75% ethanol. The exact
> problem was never determined and it was only in a few vials of the loan.
> However, Alpha Systems gave me a list of solvent/surfactant products that
> will cause the ink to dissolve, disintegration, smear, fall off:
>
> -          Industrial surfactants (Aerosol OT & Contrad) using in specimen
> rehydration. So if there is residue of these surfactants in/on the
> specimens, this may/will cause the label to fail. This might be avoided if
> specimens are rinsed well.
> -          Methyl ethyl ketone (butanone) or MEK
> -          Glacial Acetic Acid (3 mol)
> -          DEET (so if you are in the field and have DEET on your hands,
> you might not want to handle the labels)
>
> I've also been told that Thermal Transfer SDR ribbon is the better one to
> use (although they may have come out with something better.)
>
> Chris
>
>
> Chris Andrea Johnson, Ph.D.
> Curatorial Associate
> American Museum of Natural History
> Division of Invertebrate Zoology
> Central Park West at 79th Street
> New York, NY 10024
> (212) 769-5605
> [log in to unmask]
>
> Tri-trophic Digitization Project
> Picturing Science
> Collection Forum
> Entomologica Americana
> Journal of Negative Results - EEB
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Entomological Collections Network Listserve [mailto:
> [log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Simpson, Kristin B.
> Sent: Monday, August 01, 2016 6:42 PM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: Datamax Label Problem
>
> We do something similar with our laserJet printer but instead of an iron,
> we use an old press that was used to mount photographs.
>
> Kristin B. Simpson, Collections Manager
> Enns Entomology Museum
> 3-38 Agriculture Building
> mailing address:  1-33 Agriculture Building
>                              University of Missouri
>                              Columbia, Missouri  65211
> Phone:  573-882-2410
> Fax:  573-882-1469
> [log in to unmask]
> ________________________________________
> From: Entomological Collections Network Listserve [[log in to unmask]]
> on behalf of Michael A. Ivie [[log in to unmask]]
> Sent: Monday, August 01, 2016 5:03 PM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: Datamax Label Problem
>
> A couple decades ago, someone from the Smithsonian Museum Studies/Methods
> group (I forget the correct name) told us at ECN to take our labels after
> printing, put a clean piece of paper over it, and press it with a hot
> (cotton setting) iron (yes, like the one you use on your shirts), wait
> until it cooled and remove the top sheet.  This remelts the ink and presses
> it into the fibers of the paper like an old fashioned printing press. We
> have done this ever since, it seems odd, but it does seem to work as we
> have not had any label losses in all that time.
>
> Mike
>
> On 8/1/2016 3:54 PM, John M Heraty wrote:
> Dear all,
>
> Just to clarify, the Datamax is a different style of printer that prints
> specialized plastic labels. We (and the AMNH) use a similar Sato Printer
> for all of our "barcode" identifiers (it could be used for locality
> labels).  So this is a different issue than Lexmark or laser printer
> labels. Follow the link below to see the printer.
>
> As a note, I have never had any "recent" problem with label floating on
> any of my laser printer labels. I think the trick for ethanol labels is to
> print them on normal paper, not card stock. The higher temperature as the
> paper passes through the printer likely binds the ink better.
>
>
> https://www.amazon.com/Datamax-I12-00-08000007-I-4212E-Barcode-Printer/dp/B00KWJ5AKO/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1470087731&sr=8-4&keywords=datamax+printer
>
> All the best,
>
> John
>
>
>
>
> On Aug 1, 2016, at 2:30 PM, Robert Anderson <[log in to unmask]
> <mailto:[log in to unmask]>> wrote:
>
> We do not use a laser printer but rather a Lexmark (I think) inkjet
> printer and have not had any problems.  Over the years I've seen many laser
> printed labels where letters have come off and I would not suggest they be
> used for archival purposes.  A good inkjet printer is what we use. Nothing
> else.
> ________________________________________
> From: Entomological Collections Network Listserve [[log in to unmask]
> <mailto:[log in to unmask]>] on behalf of Catherine Ann Tauber [
> [log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>]
> Sent: August 1, 2016 5:09 PM
> To: [log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: Datamax Label Problem
>
> Hi Mike,
>
>
> Your guess sounds like a good possibility. You also might want to test
> whether the labels need a period of drying before they are put into
> alcohol. I found (with an old HP laser printer) that the print held up very
> nicely if I let the labels "dry" for several days to a week before putting
> them into alcohol. If they went into alcohol too soon after printing
> (before a day or two), the lettering would rub off.
>
>
> Good luck,
>
> Kady Tauber
>
> ________________________________
> From: Entomological Collections Network Listserve <[log in to unmask]
> <mailto:[log in to unmask]>> on behalf of Mike Ferro <
> [log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>>
> Sent: Monday, August 1, 2016 4:26 PM
> To: [log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Datamax Label Problem
>
> We have a Datamax O'Neil p1115s Performance Series printer for alcohol
> locality labels and database labels (wet and dry).
>
> We've been working with these labels for over a year now and not had any
> problems. I just checked a label that has been immersed in alcohol
> (EtOH)
> for more than a year and it was perfectly fine.
>
> BUT! Today we found a vial where the black lettering had floated off the
> white label. The letters were still intact (a capital B was floating
> around), indicating separation, not dissolution.
>
> An additional label in another vial was tested (see attached) and the
> letters smudged off immediately. Both vials were full of caddisflies that
> had been cleared in KOH, rinsed in EtOH, then added to the vial and the
> vial was filled with EtOH. The labels had been in the vials for about two
> weeks. (Right now the only affected labels are from a known locality, so no
> data have been lost.)
>
> Other labels in vials that contained caddisflies from the same batch that
> had not been cleared did not smudge.
>
> So my working hypotheses are either: 1) the basic solution caused
> lettering to separate; 2) the printer malfunctioned and perhaps didn't
> anneal the letters good enough; or 3) combination of the two.
>
> We currently have an experiment running
> with fresh printed labels
> : Dry; 95% EtOH; 10% KOH; 95% EtOH with two drops of 10% KOH.
>
> Has anyone else run into this situation?
> Are datamax labels that susceptible to pH?
>
>
> Thanks,
>
> Mike
>
> [Inline image 1]
> --
> Michael L. Ferro
> Collection Manager, Clemson University Arthropod Collection (CUAC) Dept.
> of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
> MAIL: 277 Poole Agricultural Center
> OFFICE: 307 Long Hall
> Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634-0310 [log in to unmask]
> <mailto:[log in to unmask]><mailto:[log in to unmask]>
> (preferred) [log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]><mailto:
> [log in to unmask]>
> https://sites.google.com/site/clemsonarthropodcollection/
> Subject Editor: The Coleopterists Bulletin; Insecta Mundi
> <20160801_152204.jpg>
>
>
>
> --
> __________________________________________________
>
> Michael A. Ivie, Ph.D., F.R.E.S.
>
> NOTE: two addresses with different Zip Codes depending on carriers
>
> US Post Office Address:
> Montana Entomology Collection
> Marsh Labs, Room 50
> PO Box 173145
> Montana State University
> Bozeman, MT 59717
> USA
>
> UPS, FedEx, DHL Address:
> Montana Entomology Collection
> Marsh Labs, Room 50
> 1911 West Lincoln Street
> Montana State University
> Bozeman, MT 59718
> USA
>
>
> (406) 994-4610 (voice)
> (406) 994-6029 (FAX)
> [log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>
>



-- 
Michael L. Ferro
Collection Manager, Clemson University Arthropod Collection (CUAC)
Dept. of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
MAIL: 277 Poole Agricultural Center
OFFICE: 307 Long Hall
Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634-0310
[log in to unmask] (preferred)
[log in to unmask]
https://sites.google.com/site/clemsonarthropodcollection/
Subject Editor: The Coleopterists Bulletin; Insecta Mundi