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Try using a Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain technique called upside-down drawing. It forces people to really look at what they're doing and keeps the brain from trying to tell them what they think it should look like. I've used that as a warm up technique for students for years. You can use a sample line drawing turned upside down for them to copy for about 5 minutes, then flip it just to look at it before they toss it and begin their actual work of really looking at a subject.
Seems to loosen folks up.
Ellen G

Sent from my iPhone

On Nov 6, 2016, at 2:17 PM, Holly Butlett <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

I always teach adults like the kids.  I use simple shapes. Circles, squares etc.   Help them to see shapes within shapes.  Also I play games.   Give them only 5 min to do a quick draw, or by memory.   Hope this helps.  Holly Butlett

On Nov 6, 2016 2:09 PM, "Laurie Bebick" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
I am teaching a  drawing class to adults who have little to no drawing experience. I am finding that many of them are struggling and are disheartened by how hard drawing is. Does anyone have advise on trying to keep their spirits-up? I have only taught 2 classes so far, one on value and how to measure proportions. I have 3 more to go.

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