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I echo what Ed said.  Nearly 20 years ago, we started switching and
changing over from the 3 dram patent-lip vials with stoppers to the 4 dram
vials with phenolic caps and polyseal cone liners.  While we have a few
large bail-top mason jars with vials inside, those are collections that
contain the vouchers for a few specific projects.  We have a few dozen
screw-top jars with shell vials that I have to return to a museum, and due
to the shipping restraints, placing the cotton-plugged individual vials
inside heat-sealed plastic will be a big PITA. That would not be the case
if they were inside screw-top vials.

Mark

On Tue, Jun 6, 2017 at 9:24 AM, Dewalt, R Edward <[log in to unmask]>
wrote:

> Karen,
>
>
>
> Good question. My responses are from my experience—I don’t know of papers
> on the subject.
>
>
>
> Cons are mostly for folks working with the specimens. If your material
> does not have much traffic, it makes little difference. Personally, as one
> who works with lots of wet specimens (mostly aquatic insects), I dislike
> this storage, but can see why some would adopt it. Consequently, my list of
> cons is a little longer, others may weigh in with more pros.
>
>
>
> Cons (some, may be others)
>
> 1.      loaning material is more difficult, sometimes collection managers
> will have to remove all in a bail jar to find the one you want
>
> 2.      prep time for loans is greater, need to be put in other storage
> for mailing
>
> 3.      Specialists visting the collection will likely be annoyed by the
> storage with this method of storage, it is slow, messy, and cumbersome to
> work through
>
> 4.      digitize the material is physically more difficult because the
> shell vials will leak during classic type, one-by-one transcription and
> catalog numbers will be harder to find afterwards
>
> 5.      gaskets for these also fail
>
> 6.      legs of specimens get tangled in cotton plugs
>
> 7.      you may find that you need many jars to separate out specimens,
> especially if you collection has lots of monotypic genera-just a guess
>
>               Pros (some, others possible)
>
> 1.      I agree that this method certainly takes up less space
>
> 2.      Double container does minimize risk of seals failing for each
> shell vial and may reduce amount of evaporated ethanol in a collection
> space, but I can’t prove it.
>
> 3.      Specimens may be easily moved from one storage to another more
> easily than vial racks or vials in paper boxes
>
> 4.      This procedure would allow for more control on the ethanol
> concentration used
>
> 5.      All of us will have to eventually move specimens from patent
> lip/stoppered vials because there is not a source of high quality stoppers.
> The ones that are available harden quickly (Neoprene) or leave a red
> pigment in the alcohol (Latex) (if anyone offers you silicone ones, tell
> them no thanks—evaporation is problematic). Moving to 3 or 4 dram storage
> with caps having plastic liners is tedious and costly—but best solution in
> my opinion. Perhaps bail jars and shell vials are less costly and involve
> less handling for transfer.
>
>
>
> Karen, if any of this is unclear—limited time to answer and lack of give
> and take—give me a ring.
>
>
>
>
>
> R. Edward DeWalt
>
> University of Illinois
>
> Prairie Research Institute
>
> Illinois Natural History Survey
>
> 1816 S Oak St.
>
> Champaign, IL 61820
>
> 217-649-7414 <(217)%20649-7414> cell
>
> [log in to unmask]
>
>
>
> Author of Plecoptera Species File
>
> http://plecoptera.speciesfile.org
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* Entomological Collections Network Listserve [mailto:
> [log in to unmask]] *On Behalf Of *Karen Wright
> *Sent:* Monday, June 05, 2017 6:26 PM
> *To:* [log in to unmask]
> *Subject:* bail top vs screw top
>
>
>
> Hi everyone, would the EtOH folks please give me a pros and cons for screw
> top vs. bail top jars for use with shell vials. Thanks, Karen
>
>
>
> Karen W Wright
>
> Assistant Curator
>
> Texas A&M University
>
> Department of Entomology
>
> 2475 TAMU
>
> College Station, TX 77843-2475
>
> (979)845-9711 <(979)%20845-9711>
>
>
>



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Mark F. O'Brien, Collection Manager

Insect Division, Museum of Zoology

Research Museums Center

The University of Michigan

3600 Varsity Drive

Ann Arbor, MI 48108

(734)-647-2199

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