Greetings to All,


The Armorial has been updated to reflect the items in this LOAR.


In Service,


Gunnar Thorisson

Vert Hawk Herald



CALONTIR Acceptances

* Ćsa á Norđrlandi. Name.

Submitted as Ćsa á Norđrlonda, the submitted form did not use the correct case for the place name. Using the correct case, the byname should be á Norđrlandi or á Norđrl{o,}ndum. With the submitter's permission, we have changed the byname to á Norđrlandi.

* Bjarki Vikarsson. Name.

The given name Bjarki was documented based on the saga hero B{o,}đvarr-Bjarki. Commenters questioned whether Bjarki is actually a given name in this construction. Scholars disagree on this question. Several scholars identify Bjarki as the given name, with B{o,}đvarr- being a prepended descriptive byname meaning "battle-army" or "fighter." As current scholarship does not agree, we are giving the submitter the benefit of the doubt and registering Bjarki as a given name pending additional research.

* Calontir, Kingdom of. Order name Order of the Falcon's Claw and badge. Purpure, in pale three falcon's feet couped inverted within a bordure Or.

Because it uses the apostrophe to mark the possessive form, this order name uses the lingua Anglica allowance. The period form would be Order of the Falcons Claw with no apostrophe. If the Kingdom prefers the form without an apostrophe, it may make a request for reconsideration.

* Calontir, Kingdom of. Order name Order of the Purple Feather of Calontir and badge. Or, a feather within a bordure purpure.

* Calontir, Kingdom of. Badge (see PENDS for order name). Or, on a hawk's bell purpure a cross of Calatrava Or, a bordure purpure.

* Calontir, Kingdom of. Heraldic title Sable Hawk Herald (see RETURNS for other heraldic titles).

* Deiniol of Llananno. Name.

* Deomotheor Z˙dmond. Name.

Submitted as Demetör Zsigmond, the article from which these names were documented used modernized spellings for these elements. With the submitter's permission, we have changed the name to the attested period spellings Deomotheor Z˙dmond for registration.

Nice 16th century Hungarian name!

* Diana Tantini. Badge. (Fieldless) An apple purpure slipped and leaved proper transfixed by a threaded needle bendwise sinister argent.

Apples in period heraldry were nearly round. There is a step from period practice for use of a modern trapezoidal-shaped apple.

* Dorcas Whitecap. Badge. (Fieldless) A barnacle goose tree Or, leaved and fructed within and conjoined to an annulet gules.

This is the defining instance of a barnacle goose tree in SCA heraldry. Conceptually similar to the vegetable lamb, the motif is found in period bestiaries, where it is explained that geese grow from trees. The geese tend to be depicted issuant from pods attached to the branches of trees while young, or attached directly to the tree by their beaks when fully formed.

Artist's note: Please draw fewer and larger geese to aid identifiability.

* Eibhilin O Beirn. Name and device. Argent, a natural sea-tortoise purpure and on a chief azure three suns argent.

Submitted as Eibhilin Ó Beirn, this name was incorrectly formed. As a matter of basic Gaelic grammar, a woman cannot use an Clan Affiliation byname constructed with Ó. [December 2016 Cover Letter] Such Clan Affiliation bynames for woman are formed in post-1200 Gaelic using inghean Uí.

However, as explained in the December 2016 Cover Letter, women may use O-style bynames in Anglicized Irish. The Anglicized Irish O Beirn is found in "16th & 17th Century Anglicized Irish Surnames from Woulfe" by Mari ingen Briain meic Donnchada. As the submitter allows all changes, we have changed the surname to the Anglicized Irish O Beirn. Anglicized Irish and Gaelic may be combined under Appendix C.

If the submitter prefers the full Gaelic Eibhilín inghean Uí Bheirn, she may make a request for reconsideration.

* Eydís Markúsardóttir. Device. Gules, four mascles in cross Or semy of torteaux.

* Fastmundr Eldjarnsson. Name.

* Gisele de la Fontaine. Name and device. Azure, a bend wavy argent cotised Or between a reremouse and a spider argent.

* Gráinne inghean Bhriain. Name.

Submitted as Gráinne inghean Bhrian, the father's name needs to be in the genitive (possessive) form when used in a Gaelic patronymic. We have corrected the byname to inghean Bhriain to use correct Gaelic grammar.

* Ívarr fótviss. Device. Vert, a Hungerford knot its ends terminating in serpents' heads addorsed and on a chief Or three pommes.

* Ívarr inn rauđi. Name and device. Argent, an arrow inverted gules between flaunches sable, each charged with a drinking horn argent.

Nice 9th-10th century Icelandic name!

* Kainen Brynjólfsson. Name and device. Argent, a raven rising maintaining in its beak a bow reversed and in chief two smith's hammers fesswise purpure within a bordure denticulada gules.

Kainen is the submitter's legal given name.

* Marget Orange. Name.

Nice English name for c. 1600! In fact, this precise name appears in the FamilySearch Historical Records as the name of a woman married in 1612 in Oxford, England.

* Ósvífr Asplund at Řyrasundi. Name change from holding name Olaf of Forgotten Sea.

Asplund is the submitter's legal surname.

Submitted as Ósvífr Asplund frá Řyrasundi, this construction indicates that the submitter lives in the Řresund strait. The more likely construction is at Řyrasundi, which indicates that he lives alongside or in the area of the strait. We have made this change for registration.

* Sólveig Melrakki. Name and device. Azure, a lion's head cabossed Or and a chief Or fretty vert.


CALONTIR  Pends

* Calontir, Kingdom of. Order name Order of the Purple Jess.

This order name is pended for further discussion of whether a jess can be considered an identifiable and distinct period charge, such as could be used to create an order name.

This was item 5 on the Calontir letter of March 31, 2017.



CALONTIR  Returns

* Calontir, Kingdom of. Heraldic title Eald-Hafoc Herald.

This name must be returned for two reasons. First, GP3B of SENA states that "we do not register heraldic titles in languages from cultures that did not use heraldic titles." We found no evidence that Old English/Anglo-Saxon cultures used heraldic titles. The earliest evidence for heraldic titles in England significantly postdates the Old English/Anglo-Saxon language.

Second, there is no evidence that this heraldic title follows an attested pattern for creating such titles. Eald-Hafoc apparently is intended to mean "old hawk." The Letter of Intent argued that the construction Eald-Hafoc fit the pattern of Other Adjective + Heraldic Charge, as described in Medieval Secular Order Names by Juliana de Luna (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/order/new/). This argument misunderstands that pattern. As set forth in multiple precedents, this pattern does not allow any descriptive adjective to be appended to a heraldic charge to create an order name or title. Rather, the attested examples have been interpreted to allow only adjectives that describe clear visual changes to the heraldic charge, such as wings or a crown. As an "old hawk" is not clearly visually different from any other hawk, this name does not follow any attested pattern and must be returned.

See the Cover Letter for a further discussion of the pattern of Other Adjective + Heraldic Charge in order names and heraldic titles.

* Calontir, Kingdom of. Heraldic title Merlyne Herald.

This heraldic title must be returned because it conflicts with the registered Award of the Marlin, belonging to the Barony of Marinus. The names differ only slightly in the initial vowel sound. However, the two names are sufficiently different that this title would be registerable with permission to conflict.

This title cannot reasonably be understood as a claim to be the fictional Merlin. Additionally, Order of Merlin from the Harry Potter books and movies is not significant enough to protect.

* Calontir, Kingdom of. Heraldic title Scir-Hafoc Herald.

This name must be returned for multiple reasons. First, GP3B of SENA states that "we do not register heraldic titles in languages from cultures that did not use heraldic titles." We found no evidence that Old English/Anglo-Saxon cultures used heraldic titles. The earliest evidence for heraldic titles in England significantly postdates the Old English/Anglo-Saxon language.

Second, there is no evidence that this heraldic title follows an attested pattern for creating such titles. Scir-Hafoc apparently is intended to mean "bright hawk." The Letter of Intent argued that the construction Scir-Hafoc fit the pattern of Other Adjective + Heraldic Charge, as described in Medieval Secular Order Names by Juliana de Luna (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/order/new/). This argument misunderstands that pattern. As set forth in multiple precedents, this pattern does not allow any descriptive adjective to be appended to a heraldic charge to create an order name or title. Rather, the attested examples have been interpreted to allow only adjectives that describe clear visual changes to the heraldic charge, such as wings or a crown. A "bright hawk" is not visually distinct from any other kind of hawk. Thus, this name does not fit the pattern Other Adjective + Charge.

See the Cover Letter for a further discussion of the pattern of Other Adjective + Heraldic Charge in order names and heraldic titles.

This name also does not fit the pattern of Color + Heraldic Charge. Only ordinary color adjectives or their heraldic equivalents are permitted in order names. "Order names which follow the <color> + <charge> pattern must use the ordinary color term for a heraldic tincture appropriate for the language of the order name." [May 2009 Cover Letter]. "Bright" is not an ordinary color term.

Finally, the prior registration of the name Royal University of Scir-Hafoc to Calontir does not allow the registration of this title under PN1B2g. There is no evidence that heraldic titles were created based on the names of universities. Further, Scir-Hafoc appears to have been constructed as personal name or object name. The Royal University website says: "Our name, Scir-Hafoc, comes from an Old English term meaning "bright falcon" and is used with the express permission of its creator, Margaret Clark." There is no evidence that heraldic titles were created based on personal names. As stated above, Scir-Hafoc also does not fit the attested patterns for creating heraldic titles based on objects.

For all of these reasons, we must return this heraldic title.


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