Gunnar,

Thank you for all of these!

D^



From: Jeremy Sacksteder <[log in to unmask]>

Greetings to All,

The Armorial has been updated to reflect the items in this LOAR.

In Service,

Gunnar Thorisson
Vert Hawk Herald


CALONTIR Acceptances
* Alfgeirr skytja. Device change. Or, an owl-headed bear rampant guardant between three decrescents purpure.
The submitter's previous device, Vert, on a Mongolian yurt argent an owl sable, is retained as a badge.
* Axel Sialfason. Badge. (Fieldless) A Thor's hammer sable and a serpent entwined Or.
* Baine Montgomerie. Name and device. Azure, on a plate between three mullets of seven points argent an owl rising wings displayed sable.
Submitted as Báine Montgomerie, no evidence could be found that the Gaelic given name Báine was ever used by real people (as opposed to by a purely legendary figure). As such, it is not registerable. However, Baine is a gray-period Scots given name found in the FamilySearch Historical Records. With the submitter's permission, we have changed the given name to this form for registration.
* Baine Montgomerie. Badge. (Fieldless) An owl rising wings displayed sable.
Nice badge!
* Calontir, Kingdom of. Order name Order of the Stíle Fyrd and badge. Sable, on a pile embattled between two rapiers in pile argent, a cross of Calatrava purpure.
There is no evidence of "order names" as we understand them in the Anglo-Saxon/Old English culture. Ordinarily, this lack of evidence would bar registration of an order name using Old English elements. As stated in the April 2011 Cover Letter:
[S]ome times and places are just out of luck for the creation of herald's titles and order names. We have no evidence that either were in use before the 12th century, and only a few patterns were in use before 1300. That means that languages that fell out of use before that time (Old Norse, Old English, Frankish, etc.) cannot be used to create heraldic titles or order names, as there are no patterns for them to follow.
However, Calontir has already registered several order names using Old English words as substantive elements, including the Order of the Iren-Fyrd and Order of the Iren-Hird. Thus, Calontir may continue to register Old English elements in order names under the Existing Registration Allowance.
This order name can be registered to Calontir under the Existing Registration Allowance based on the prior registration of Order of the Iren-Fyrd, which uses the pattern Metal + Fyrd (meaning "peasant levy"). Like iren ("iron"), stíle ("steel") is an Anglo-Saxon word for a metal.
* Calontir, Kingdom of. Order name Order of the Stíle Hirth and badge. Per chevron embattled sable and argent, in pale two rapiers in chevron crossed at the tips argent and a cross of Calatrava purpure.
There is no evidence of "order names" as we understand them in the Anglo-Saxon/Old English culture. Ordinarily, this lack of evidence would bar registration of an order name using Old English elements. As stated in the April 2011 Cover Letter:
[S]ome times and places are just out of luck for the creation of herald's titles and order names. We have no evidence that either were in use before the 12th century, and only a few patterns were in use before 1300. That means that languages that fell out of use before that time (Old Norse, Old English, Frankish, etc.) cannot be used to create heraldic titles or order names, as there are no patterns for them to follow.
However, Calontir has already registered several order names using Old English words as substantive elements, including the Order of the Iren-Fyrd and Order of the Iren-Hird. Thus, Calontir may continue to register Old English elements in order names under the Existing Registration Allowance.
This order name can be registered to Calontir under the Existing Registration Allowance based on the prior registration of Order of the Iren-Hird, which uses the pattern of Metal + Hirth/Hird (meaning "bodyguard of the king/noble"). Like iren ("iron"), stíle ("steel") is an Old English word for a metal.
This depiction of per chevron embattled is too low for registration, per the guidelines of the August 2011 Cover Letter. However, Calontir's previous submissions had this same ratio and placement of the line of division, so this is allowable under the Existing Registration Allowance.
Likewise, this depiction of two items "in saltire" has the charges crossing too close to the tips to be considered "in saltire." However, in the previous registration of Per chevron embattled sable and argent, in pale two strung bows in saltire argent and a cross of Calatrava purpure for the Order of the Boga Hirth in 1989, the bows are crossed much closer to the upper tips of the bow than the middles, so this arrangement of two items in chevron, tips crossed, and a cross of Calatrava in base is allowable under the Existing Registration Allowance, even if such a layout would normally break Unity of Posture rules.
Artist's note: Please draw the cross of Calatrava larger to fill the available space.
* Calontir, Kingdom of. Reblazon of badge for Order of the Boga Hirth. Per chevron embattled sable and argent, in pale two strung bows in chevron crossed at the tips argent and a cross of Calatrava purpure.
Previously registered as Per chevron embattled sable and argent, in pale two strung bows in saltire argent and a cross of Calatrava purpure, this badge for the Order of the Boga Hirth in 1989, has the bows crossed much closer to the upper tips of the bow than the middles. As this pattern is used elsewhere in this letter for an Existing Registration Allowance, we are accurately reblazoning it here.
* Charles Vaux. Name.
Nice French or English name from the 14th century onwards!
* Eilína Knútsdóttir. Name.
* Elzebeth van Rostock. Device. Azure, on a cross nowy argent a tree blasted vert.
There is a step from period practice for the use of the cross nowy.
* Erik de Tyr. Device. Per chevron argent and gules, two ravens rising addorsed sable and a wolf rampant argent.
* Luther Hoffen Drunck. Name.
Submitted as Luther Hoffendrunk, no evidence was found supporting Hoffendrunk as a period name. Although Gotfrid Saker worked very hard to construct the requested name, the evidence he found showed a number of bynames based on drinking, but not one in the form Hoffen-. Further, in medieval German, Hoffen- and Hofen- usually denoted a farmstead and did not have the submitter's intended meaning "hoping for."
However, Hoffen and Drunck are both late period German bynames. As double surnames are permitted in German, with the submitter's permission we have changed the name to Luther Hoffen_Drunck for registration.
* Nikita Pavlovich. Name.
Nice 16th century Russian name!
* Raleigh MacCaba. Name (see RETURNS for device).
* Rosalie Langmod. Badge. (Fieldless) On a rose purpure a Latin cross bottony Or.
* Þorunnr eyverska. Name.

CALONTIR Returns
* Calontir, Kingdom of. Order name Order of the Eo Fyrd.
There is no evidence of "order names" as we understand them in the Anglo-Saxon/Old English culture. Ordinarily, this lack of evidence would bar registration of an order name using Old English elements. As stated in the April 2011 Cover Letter:
[S]ome times and places are just out of luck for the creation of herald's titles and order names. We have no evidence that either were in use before the 12th century, and only a few patterns were in use before 1300. That means that languages that fell out of use before that time (Old Norse, Old English, Frankish, etc.) cannot be used to create heraldic titles or order names, as there are no patterns for them to follow.
However, Calontir has already registered several order names using Old English words as substantive elements, including the Order of the Boga Fyrd and Order of the Boga Hirth. Thus, Calontir may continue to register Old English elements in order names under the Existing Registration Allowance.
In support of this order name, Calontir relied on its prior registrations of Order of the Boga Fyrd and Order of the Iren-Fyrd. Unfortunately, neither of these prior registrations support the submitted order name. As stated in NPN1C2g, "To use the [Existing Registration Allowance], the new submission must be similar in content to the existing pattern." The example to NPN1C2g illustrates the limits of the Existing Registration Allowance:
For example, if a branch had registered an order name Crimson Sleeve, they could use that to modify a new, similar object such as Crimson Glove. However, they could not register Crimson Bowl, as a bowl is not the same type of object as a sleeve. Likewise, the owner of Diamond Herald and Ruby Herald could use the grandfather clause to register Order of the Saphire. [sic] The owner could not register Order of the Diamond Ring or Order of the Gold, because the pattern of registered items is limited to precious stones, not jewelry or precious items in general.
Here, the patterns already registered are Metal + Fyrd (Iren-Fyrd) and Weapon + Fyrd (Boga Fyrd). As Eo means "a war-horse, charger," the first pattern obviously does not apply. The second pattern does not apply either because, even treating the registration of Boga Hirth as allowing a pattern encompassing all weapons, a war horse is not a weapon. A war horse is animal, not an inanimate object wielded by a person like a bow. Thus, this order name is not registerable.
* Calontir, Kingdom of. Order name Order of the Eo Hirth.
There is no evidence of "order names" as we understand them in the Anglo-Saxon/Old English culture. Ordinarily, this lack of evidence would bar registration of an order name using Old English elements. As stated in the April 2011 Cover Letter:
[S]ome times and places are just out of luck for the creation of herald's titles and order names. We have no evidence that either were in use before the 12th century, and only a few patterns were in use before 1300. That means that languages that fell out of use before that time (Old Norse, Old English, Frankish, etc.) cannot be used to create heraldic titles or order names, as there are no patterns for them to follow.
However, Calontir has already registered several order names using Old English words as substantive elements, including the Order of the Boga Fyrd and Order of the Boga Hirth. Thus, Calontir may continue to register Old English elements in order names under the Existing Registration Allowance.
In support of this order name, Calontir relied on its prior registrations of Order of the Boga Hirth and Order of the Iren-Hird. Unfortunately, neither of these prior registrations support the submitted order name. As stated in NPN1C2g, "To use the [Existing Registration Allowance], the new submission must be similar in content to the existing pattern." The example to NPN1C2g illustrates the limits of the Existing Registration Allowance:
For example, if a branch had registered an order name Crimson Sleeve, they could use that to modify a new, similar object such as Crimson Glove. However, they could not register Crimson Bowl, as a bowl is not the same type of object as a sleeve. Likewise, the owner of Diamond Herald and Ruby Herald could use the grandfather clause to register Order of the Saphire. [sic] The owner could not register Order of the Diamond Ring or Order of the Gold, because the pattern of registered items is limited to precious stones, not jewelry or precious items in general.
Here, the patterns already registered are Metal + Hirth/Hirð (Iren-Hird) and Weapon + Hirth/Hirð (Boga Hirth). As Eo means "a war-horse, charger," the first pattern obviously does not apply. The second pattern does not apply either because, even treating the registration of Boga Hirth as allowing a pattern encompassing all weapons, a war horse is not a weapon. A war horse is animal, not an inanimate object wielded by a person like a bow. Thus, this order name is not registerable.
* Hugo Smith. Badge. Argent, on a pellet a mallet between the points of a stag's attire Or.
This badge must be returned for use of two different tertiary charge groups on the same charge, in violation of SENA Appendix I, Section C. Commentary was overwhelmingly against interpreting these as co-tertiary charges (that is, that they would be co-primary if appearing on a field rather than on a charge). The motif "a mallet between the points of a stag's attire Or" would not have the same problem if it were directly on the field.
* Raleigh MacCaba. Device. Checky Or and vert, on a bend sinister sable three compass stars palewise Or.
This submission is returned for violation of SENA A3B4, which requires that placement of charges allow for good contrast with their underlying field. Though this submission has a neutral field and a color charge, the placement of the bend sinister sable places it entirely into contact with the vert checks of the field, giving poor armorial contrast. A recolor of the field to checky vert and Or should solve this.
There is a step from period practice for use of compass stars. We encourage the submitter to consider more period depictions of mullets.

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