Print

Print


Karen,

Thank You!

Ooops, I meant psd, my mistake. I will leave images at PSD. There are only two or three who understand the Photoshop process. Fortunately, there are only about 17 artists. The photocopy repro at the art center is excellent quality. Using your guidance will help me get the best reproduction. 300 dpi, it will be.

Again, Thank You for your guidance!

OC 

On Mar 27, 2018, at 7:52 PM, Karen Ackoff <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

OC,

I will answer this at length later when I’m at my computer. I’m tapping this out on my iPhone just now. For print, images should be 300dpi at the size they will be in your booklet. 

Leave them as PSD docs; no reason to convert to EPS. Don’t keep them as JPG files. Saving and resaving results in loss if image quality. Yeah you can save once or twice and get away with it. But PSD is better. There are color mode considerations - RGB vs CMYK. You can reduce the size of an image, as it effectively increases resolution. In InDesign, select your image and look at the LINKS panel. The EFFECTIVE PPI is what should be 300. You can probably get away with 240. If you increase the size/resolution in Photoshop, Photoshop does a best guess interpolation at adding information which tends to make the image look out of focus. If you sharpen it, you’re back to pixelation. 

You can use Genuine Fractals - a Photoshop plug-in that increases resolution very nicely. Not cheap - maybe $300? I do have a technique I use which isn’t bad, and I’ll dig up the web address for you. But really, artists should provide you a hi res image (unless you are being paid for your time to deal with resolution issues). Artists ought to be used to this by now. And you can get decent pictures off most cell phones these days. 

If you can provide me with the size/resolution on one of the photos you are working with, I can check actual numbers. 

I’m assuming if you’re printing from photocopier, that you will not have any page bleeds. Unless you plan to print on larger paper and trim everything down. Expect color shifts from a copier. You can tweak it a bit, but colors will shift. Light beige in particular colors can shift towards green or red. 

That should get you started. 

K





From my iPhone. 

On Mar 27, 2018, at 6:22 PM, OC ocarlislephoto <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

I am preparing an exhibition booklet (5.5 x 8.5 inches, portrait layout) for our local painters group; using InDesign. Photos of their paintings, from varied devices are arriving at 72 dpi. I had asked for images to be 200 dpi, longest dimension at 1200 pixels, jpg format. Will give the art center a pdf of the booklet for printing in house on a quality photocopier.

Published images will be approximately 2 inches wide with biographical text next to the image. Had test printed a 72 dpi/ppi image on my Epson inkjet printer, yes it was “pixelated”. 

Have been opening images in Photoshop, saving to eps format. Use image size, change to 200 dpi/ppi & 1200 pixels, longest side. Then change back to a jpg format to insert into the InDesign document.

Am I on the right track for this? I had read/heard that changing anything in a jpg format, image deterioration would occur; the reason that I saved as a Photoshop file to change the dpi/ppi.

Thank You very much indeed for your expert guidance.

OC Carlisle
Scientific Illustration, Photographic Fine Art
Guild of Natural Science Illustrators
“Take Flight And Soar With Your Dreams”




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