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Thanks Brian and Anne for the suggestions. 


In particular reading the reports of the war production board (at least the ones that have been digitized as the library is closed) has been very instructive. It's a fascinating story. I knew that the transformation to wartime production was a 'messy' process but it was messier than I had appreciated and certainly *far* messier than the history books tell it. I found myself laughing out loud a few times imagining how difficult it all must have been and the creative solutions those folks came up with. 

 

Jim, I'm looking a several 33 NAICS categories (Manufacturing), mostly 331, 333, 335 and 336. More particularly precision steel, aluminum, electronic. and fiberglass manufacturing. So, for example -- while I can get tons of raw aluminum, I have not been able to find it by grade of aluminum nor can I accurately determine materials loss rates during manufacture, nor can I determine manufacture times.  Any thoughts? 


My plan for now is to report what I can, identify the shortcomings in the data, and suggest a path forward based somewhat upon the approaches taken by the board.

Stay safe everybody. 

Best,
Tom






Dr. Thomas Kemp

Chair and Professor

Department of Economics

University of Wisconsin - Eau Claire

Eau Claire, WI 54702


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715 836 2150


From: AFEEMAIL Discussion List <[log in to unmask]> on behalf of Jim Peach <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Sunday, May 17, 2020 2:45 PM
To: [log in to unmask] <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: Estimating Real (Physical) Manufacturing Output
 

Tom

     What NAICS codes are you looking at  Some are easy to ind.  Examples include iron ore, steel, copper, automobiles, oil and gas. 

 

From: AFEEMAIL Discussion List <[log in to unmask]> On Behalf Of Kemp, Thomas A.
Sent: Tuesday, May 12, 2020 11:54 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: [AFEEMAIL] Estimating Real (Physical) Manufacturing Output

 

Dear AFEE folks,

 

I'm working on a project where we are estimating physical potential economic output of specific manufactured goods. 

 

I've already identified the firms that could likely 'do the work' using a mix of Census data, NAICS coding, and proprietary firm data. 

 

From the latter I have data on the economic value (Revenues) of output at the firm and industry level but would prefer to be able to present findings in terms of physical output (e.g., Tonnes of manufactured output). 

 

There's virtually no lit on this that I can find on how to go about doing this in a practical way. There are a couple of papers on Chinese physical capacity that I've found (clearly targeted towards the potential of military production) but almost nothing else.  

 

So here's my question;

 

I'm sure that a lot of thought was put into this problem during the early days of the second world war. E.g., "How many tanks can this Ford car plant turn out in a week"? Does anybody know of where I might find some published description of the processes that economists of the era employed to do this? 

 

I know that Veblen worked on this kind of stuff during World War I but that process seems to have been pretty unscientific. (At least Veblen didn't go into any detail that I can find.)  

 

Given that there are a couple 100 firms that I've identified I'm hoping to find something better than 'just go ask them'. 

 

 

Many thanks,

Tom

 

 

Dr. Thomas Kemp

Chair and Professor

Department of Economics

University of Wisconsin - Eau Claire

Eau Claire, WI 54702

 

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715 836 2150