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I do a fair amount of digital art (in Photoshop and Illustrator on a Dell
machine). I recently purchased an HP scanjet 6200C and have been quite pleased
with the quality of the scans. It allows you to select the output resolution and
vary the highlights, midtones and shadows. (It does lots of other things too, but
I have not had time to explore much further.) The scan area is not very big, only
8.5 x  11, but that has not been a problem so far.

Callie Mack
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Jeremy Stoller wrote:

> It has been quite some time since I did any research on scanners, but
> the last I checked Epson scanners were getting rave reviews. I have
> mixed feelings about refurbished equipment. I would make sure that there
> is some kind of warenty or return period, and when you first get the
> machine realy push it to the limits. If you can open it up with out
> breaking anything you might want to do that as well, just to make sure
> it wasn't "refurbished" with bubble gum and duct tape.
>
> -Jeremy Stoller
>
> Erica Beade wrote:
> >
> > Hi Karen,
> >
> > Thanks for the feedback. I should have said the problem is with continuous
> > tone pencil drawings. I've used an HP 6100 at Kinko's for a couple of
> > years, and it does a fine job with only minor brightness/contrast
> > adjustments.  But the Microtek seems to lose information in the highlights
> > and shadows. Adjustments help slightly but not nearly enough.
> > Unfortunately, the HP 6100 is no longer available.
> >
> > Another question: has anyone had experience with buying refurbished
> > computer equipment from manufacturers? Epson is offering a good deal on one
> > of their earlier models - one which got good reviews in MacWorld and other
> > mags - the Expression 636 ("Artist" model). Any thoughts?
> >
> > Thanks,
> >
> > Erica
> >
> > Erica,
> >
> > I get very respectable results from my old MicroteK IISP scanner.
> >
> > How are you scanning your b&w artwork? If you are scanning for line...
> > getting a good scan takes a little work. Scan as a greyscale, then adjust
> > the contrast and brightness, eliminating light grey tones. Then convert to
> > a bitmap. I would suggest 600 dpi. If your scanner is not 600 dpi, then
> > scan 300 dpi at 200%.
> >
> > I highly recommend the book REAL WORLD SCANNING AND HALFTONES.
> >
> > Karen Ackoff
> > Assistant Professor of Fine Arts
> > Indiana University South Bend
> > 1700 Mishawaka Avenue
> > South Bend, IN 36634
> > Ph: 219-237-4124
> > E-mail: [log in to unmask]
>
> --
> Jeremy Stoller
> Stoller Design Associates
> [log in to unmask]
> http://www.StollerDesign.com/jeremy